“homemade mild salsa recipe best homemade chunky salsa recipe”

In a food processor or blender, I combine a can of diced tomatoes, a can of Rotel which is seasoned diced tomatoes with green chilies, 1/2 of a small onion, 1/2 of a jalapeno, lime juice, garlic, cilantro, honey and a few spices. Pulse for 30 seconds and that’s it. I’ve been known to throw in half a cucumber and a carrot before too. This is the kind of salsa that you can’t really screw up. You can follow the recipe below as a guideline and do as you like to make it your own.

Awesome Barb! Glad it turned out so good. I do love this salsa recipe. Your modification ideas sound pretty good too. As for shelf life, I got the base for this recipe in a Better Homes and Gardens book, and mostly just modified the spices and such, so I would say its pretty safe. I’m still eating mine a year after it was canned and I haven’t killed myself off yet! You should be good for a year as well too.

This is soooo good. Got this off Pinterest and made last night. It’s almost all gone. I’ll be eating salsa a whole lot more now. I added more garlic (2 large cloves), a bit more salt and a really large jalapeno with seeds. It’s perfect! Thanks so much for this awesome recipe. I used to go to Austin Grill just for the salsa and now I don’t have to do that anymore!

I like to keep a big jar of the homemade salsa in my refrigerator for up to a week. I serve the chips and salsa with quick weeknight dinners like quesadillas or tacos, and Keith loves them as a side with his sandwiches at lunch. The kids even dip veggies in the salsa for afternoon snacks. I’m not exaggerating when I say that this is truly a kitchen staple — whether we’re hosting a party or not!

Just finished canning a batch of this salsa. Thank you for the recipe! I had some banana peppers so I used them in place of the Anaheim peppers. I also used roma tomatoes and San Marzano tomatoes (both plum tomatoes) from our garden. I did drain the juice from my cut tomatoes, but added some back into the pot while making my salsa because it was quite thick even before adding the tomato paste. I didn’t have any cumin seeds, so I added about a half a teaspoon of ground cumin. Wasn’t sure if this was too much, but it seems to taste fine. This is a great recipe.

Cut the tomatoes in half and squeeze out the juice and seeds. I’ve been making my own salsa for a while now and found that was the best way to get the consistency I wanted. Plus, tomatoes are pretty acidic and this helps lower the acidity.

Q. My question is about salsa. I was going to borrow a pressure cooker to make salsa this year (for the first time). My grandma told me that I didn’t need the pressure cooker, I could just make salsa using the “inversion” method like I did the blueberry jam. Can I do this?

Each week there will be recipes that go head-to-head in a friendly competition. Our Easy Homemade Salsa Recipe will be featured beginning September 12th, so head on over and vote, you could win prizes as well!

4 Simmer all ingredients in a large pot: Put all of the ingredients into a large (8-qt) stainless steel pot. (Do not use aluminum or the acidity of the sauce will cause the aluminum to leach into the sauce.)

I think so, but maybe see if the Ball Blue Book or another official canning resource has a recipe using lemon/lime juice as the acid is critical for safe canning! I do know that you should use bottled juice and not fresh, as the acid is a known quantity.

wow–no ro-tel in canada? its just inconceivable to someone from oklahoma usa. i hope at least you live close to the border lol. best of luck in your search for it from one old guy cook to nord de ligne. tom

I made your salsa last year and it was awesome. For us here on the East Coast of Canada, we found that it required a little too much lime juice, but it turned out sooo good and I have had so many compliments. Thank you. Lillian

Awesome! Thanks Snick. I’m so glad you guys liked the salsa. It is a tasty recipe for sure. Welcome to the “ex-runny salsa club!” You should try my peach salsa recipe too. It may be even more delicious. http://thebaldgourmet.com/recipe-canned-peach-salsa-with-lime/

Here is my recipe but just know you can customize it completely to fit your needs. You could skip the jalapeno if you don’t like spicy. You could add black beans or corn to have a different spin. If you like it chunky just add an extra can of diced tomatoes at the end. So many ideas!

Haha, always worth the question! I just don’t know about pH levels and food safety of using canned so you might try googling to see if any of the main canning experts (Ball, NCFHP, etc) have anything to say about it.

I like using apple cider vinegar in canning because I like the flavor, and it comes from apples. Most white vinegar comes from a variety of sources, including wood pulp. I use it white vinegar for cleaning, but it can be substituted in canning recipes if you like. The pH is the same. Lemon or lime juice can also be substituted for the vinegar in this recipe – but they give a more pronounced flavor.

Many of us begin a vegetable garden with dreams of preserving the harvest dancing in our heads. Even if you don’t grow food, the fresh ingredients for homemade salsa are abundant at farmers markets and farm stands during the growing season. Stock up with enough to can a batch of homemade salsa and enjoy the delicious flavors of summer all winter long.

Sadly, I just put up all my hot peppers yesterday so there won’t be any salsa for me. But I am printing and stashing this recipe for next fall when I’m up to my eye teeth in peppers and tomatoes again. Love the change to smoked paprika – it’s one of my favorite little game changers tomato pepper salsa recipe chili and Mexican rice. Really beautiful photo (you know I watch those) and did I hear there’s a new bowl coming??

Next add one large can of whole peeled tomatoes, starting with the juice and then with the tomatoes. I found that this method helped me from ending up with tomato juice speckled clothes which then saved me all from having to pre-treat the white shirt I wore while making salsa.

Instead, I cut the tomatoes in half, place them cut-side down on a baking sheet, pop them under the hot oven broiler for 3-4 minutes (watch closely!) and the skins will wrinkle right up when the pan is removed, and after they are cooled, the skins will peel off really easily.

The tomatoes you use should be able to stand up to the canning process. Good  varieties to use (such as Roma or Beefsteak) have thick walls and less water than other varieties. Instead of buying them at the supermarket, I suggest buying them from a local farmer’s market. I picked mine up from an Amish community market – an enormous box full (that I could barely lift) for around ten or twelve dollars. (That being said, I had way more than the 15 lbs this recipe calls for, so I made more than one batch) If possible, buy all of your salsa veggies this way.

Salsa is a versatile condiment that can go on chips, burritos, eggs, or even mixed in with ranch for a healthier salad dressing.  Salsa is naturally low in calories and speeds up the body’s metabolism, making it a fantastic addition to your diet.  Commercial salsas can be loaded with sodium and contain preservatives, so making your own  easy homemade salsa recipe is a good idea.  Plus, fresh always tastes better!

About an hour or so later, the mixture will be reduced to about half and it is ready to put into sterile jars.  I put mine in half pints and added sugar to the bottom of each one.  This gives it a little bit of sweet flavor and I love it!

And we have home canning, preserving, drying and freezing directions. You can access recipes and other resources from the drop down menus at the top of the page or the site search. If you have any questions or suggestions, feel free to write me! Also make your own ice cream; see How to make ice cream and ice cream making equipment and manuals. Have fun, eat healthier and better tasting, and save money by picking your own locally grown fruit and vegetables, and then using our easy  directions

Hi Janet. I haven’t tried freezing my salsa so I’m not sure how it will be. Probably just fine would be my guess. I’m curious to know, so if you wouldn’t mind, please let me know how it works out. Thanks for commenting. Happy eating!

I love, love, love this salsa. I’ve made it several times and it’s been runny, so this time I drained out some of the juice from the can of tomatoes (not the Rotel). Perfection!!! Thank you thank you!

Hi excited to try this recipe ! Do I have to boil the tomatoes for 20 minutes or can I get by with just heating til it’s hot. I often find canned salsas are a little over cooked by the time they go through the cooking and the canning processing time. Thank, Melissa

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Follow standard canning instructions to sterilize the jars and lids.  Ladle the hot salsa into the hot jars, leaving about 1/4 inch head space.  Close the lids and place the jars in a boiling water bath for 15 minutes.  Remove the jars and let them rest, undisturbed, for 24 hours before moving them.

This recipe looks delicious. I loved tomatoes. For my every salsa preparation I prefer tomatoes. But, never tried cucumber. It sounds me and I can’t wait to make it with cucumber. Thanks for sharing such a wonderful recipe.

Allowing tomato-based recipes like this to get cold and quiescently congeal is important. My very first batch is sitting in the refrigerator right now. It is a bit runny, but I’m not draining off those flavor-infused juices. No need to.

Once the garlic is in the pot, add the remaining ingredients. Bring to a boil then reduce the heat and boil gently for 30 minutes. Stir often, making sure it doesn’t burn on the bottom (TIP: cheap, thin-bottomed stock pots tend to burn, but thicker-bottomed pots don’t – it’s worth it to pay a few dollars more. #lessonlearned).

Transfer to airtight container and serve immediately with chips. However, I prefer to refrigerate salsa for 1 day prior to serving because I prefer chilled salsa and because the flavors marry, mellow, and the flavor improves on the second and third day. Salsa will likely keep up to 1 week airtight in the fridge; however, we’ve always eaten a batch within 3 days.

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