“homemade mexican salsa recipe _homemade black bean and corn salsa recipe”

The humble tomato packs a nutritious punch. One medium tomato has about as much fiber as a slice of whole wheat bread. Tomatoes are also a good source of vitamins C and A, plus contain potassium and phosphorous.

Dip a cold metal spoon into the boiling soft spread. Lift the spoon and hold it horizontally with edge down so that the syrup runs off the edge. As the mixture cooks, the drops will become heavier and will drop off the spoon separately but two at a time. When the two drops join together and “sheet” off the spoon, the gel stage has been reached.

* – This assumes you already have the pots, pans, ladles, and reusable equipment. Note that you can reuse the jars!  Many products are sold in jars that will take the lids and rings for canning.  For example, Classico spaghetti sauce is in quart sized jars that work with Ball and Kerr lids and rings

Chill a small saucers in the freezer. Place a teaspoonful of soft spread on the chilled saucer and place in the freezer for 1 minute. Remove the saucer from the freezer and push the edge of the spread with your finger. A mixture that has reached the gel stage will be set, and the surface will wrinkle when the edge is pushed.

I have a question. I noticed from the pictures that the tomatoes when cooked look like the consistency of tomato sauce, no chunks …..however in your last picture of the finished product there is lots of tomato chunks (my kinda salsa) – how is this done?

Hi! I’m Katie, and I’m the chief mess-maker around here trying to journey to better stewardship of my family’s health and the environment – while balancing a budget and limited time (did I mention I have 4 kids?).

I do have a question though – does this recipe meet or pass any specific canning requirements for salsa? Last year it didn’t stick around long but this year if I make multiple batches some jars may hang around a little longer than others and I’m always paranoid about the safety of canning salsa. (I never give it away unless its fresh and I know they’ll eat it right away…) Any comments would be appreciated!

I like mine with a few cloves of garlic added to the mix, and then black beans and corn stirred in after the food processor has done its thing. Never tried the honey, I will have to do that next time.

Good question Nancy. You will have better results using fresh tomatoes instead of canned. The canned tomatoes may not hold their texture well and not produce a thick and chunky salsa texture. You can use store bought Roma tomatoes instead of fresh garden tomatoes. They won’t taste as good of course, but will still do the trick.

4) When it comes to my step-by-step guide below, I have used a steam bath canner to process the salsa. Disclaimer: Even though I prefer to use a steam bath canner (and so do lots of other home canners), many people and resources say there isn’t enough research about steam canners to know if they are safe enough to use.

[…] brimming with red balls of beautiful fruit. I’ve already preserved about fifteen jars of my Homemade Salsa and today I’ll be making batches of Tomato Sauce for this Winter. I love being able to pull […]

Hi Tina. Good question. I don’t know about cornstarch and what that would do from a canning perspective. Older cans of tomato paste often do get a metallic taste from the can, but new/fresh cans usually do not in my experience if that helps at all.

Sorry to send you an essay – but 2 questions: do you think we could NOT clean the peppers (still skimping on onions), and use organic lemon juice? Santa Cruz makes it, but I have yet to find the ability to swallow their price… But I will when we get the tomatoes.

Joshua and Gloria, expats living in Peru, still have a powerful connection with Mexico. Gloria, who was born in the United States to parents of Mexican descent, prepares family recipes passed down from generation to generation.

If by “cleaning” the peppers you mean not taking all the seeds and membranes out- definitely leave them in if you want a hot sauce. I leave about 1/2 in, but my batches always turn out differently depending on the hotness of the peppers I’m using. I’ve not figured out a way to overcome that. 🙂

Hi Alicia – I use about 10 pounds of tomatoes, give or take, which often yields 10 cups of tomatoes (after they’ve been peeled, chopped and drained). I hate throwing out that exact pound amount because so much depends on the variety of tomato and how long they drain, etc, but it’s a good starting place.

Also, while we are on the topic of modifications, if you want to make this on a whim and you don’t have lime juice, white vinegar works just fine. I also make this without cilantro when my dad will be eating it because he hates cilantro. And it’s still good!

The tomatoes come last, just because I want to be the most gentle with them, but I guess it’s not all that important. Everything thus far goes from the food processor to the 4-cup measuring cup, then into the pot.

It in never safe to eat salsa that has not been properly canned. Because it is not reheated before consuming it. It is eaten right from the jar.In the directions it says you do not need to hot water bath, or pressure can the salsa, that is false information, you need to can the salsa no matter whether the hot salsa will seal the jars. Canning the salsa insures that the seal will be strong enough and the salsa hot enough to kill the bacteria that can be in the jar. Please only can salsa recipes that that are proven safe, this one does not have enough vinegar or acid to deem it easy refrigerator salsa recipe safe recipe for canning. Would be good to freeze though. If you want to compare your recipe to a safe one look at a current blue ball book. tweaking the recipes are not safe either. I know that you probably had no issues with what you ate,but it’s recipes like this that can cause harm to people who no nothing about canning! Salsa has a lot of non acid ingredients, that potentially cause the food to spoil if not prepared properly. I’m by no means trying to be mean, but trying to keep people safe. Food poisoning sucks, botulism can kill.

I never really cared for store bought salsa so I decided to come up with my own recipe. Now I can’t make enough of it! I am always asked to bring it with me to any family get-together or potluck. I always leave with an empty bowl!—Dana Sapp, Scottsville, Kentucky

Check out the growing list of both water bath and pressure canning recipes that make up the bulk of my canning pantry. As a Master Food Preserver I strive to give you safe recipes from many trusted sources. As you can see there are hundreds of ingredients and recipes will contain pictures of the final food in jars. Click on any of the links and it will take you into the homemade world of canning so you can get started on your sustainable pantry. Enjoy!

One can indeed use a pressure canner for canning salsa . I always use Roma tomatoes and never use the tomatoe paste (optional) in the recipe . It never turns out to liquidity or mushy ,not ever . Very certain the reason for that is the Roma’s are a meaty tomato. I have tried the water bath method as well with this recipe , both have the same consistency. I pressure can at 10 lbs. of pressure for 15 min. Adjust lbs. of pressure for your elevation .

Great question, Liz…and very timely. I’ve been making batches of this salsa for the last few days and keep forgetting to weigh the tomatoes for a precise measurement. I am making another batch tomorrow and will do so and report back! So much depends on the variety and exact size of the tomato, so I’ll get a weight measure that will take the guesswork out of it. You definitely want to use a full 10 cups of chopped tomatoes for proper pH levels.

Hahaha, we haven’t been to the Beltline Bar in forever. Mostly we don’t like the hour long wait time! We have been going to El Arriero on 28th st near Woodland Mall. My son loves the salsa and he has eaten salsa with a spoon too!

Use your jar lifter to place the jars into the canner leaving space in between them. Once jars are all in canner, adjust the water level so it is at least one inch above the jar tops. Add more boiling water if needed so the water level is at least one inch above the jar tops. When adding water, use the hot water from the small pot your lids were in. Pour the water around the jars and not directly onto them.

I made this last year with home grown walla walla onions and the yellow peppers. The salsa was wonderful although a little sweet. My girlfriend thought maybe the onions and the yellow pepper. Any suggestions as to what I might do to take the too sweet out? Other then that it was the best ever.

Wow this is good! I doubled the recipe, and even though I forgot the jalepeno, the Rotel really does give some nice heat. The honey, fresh lime and cilantro really freshen it up. This will be my go to salsa recipe. Thanks!!!

We lived in West Texas for 18 years and now live in NE Pennsylvania. Didn’t have to worry about Salsa in Texas as there was a Mexican restaurant on almost every corner. Not so in PA. I have been making my Salsa (Mexican Chili) from a good Mexican friend of ours now for 12 years with some adjustments, 1 large can of Furmano’s whole tomatoes, jalapenos, cumin, coriander, salt fresh cilantro (when we can get it), minced garlic, diced yellow onions, lemon and lime juice, and some other spices. Will have to say it is VERY good.Have had many people Rave about it who are transplants like myself from Texas and California.

Cover the jars with at least 1-inch of water. Bring to a rolling boil and process for 15 minutes (20 minutes for altitudes 1000 to 6000 ft, 25 minutes above 6000 ft). Then turn off heat and let the jars sit in the hot water for 5 minutes.

Hi Kari. The tomatoes in the can are small to medium sized tomatoes, and there are plenty in there. I tested the recipe using canned, not fresh, so I can’t say for absolute certain, but my best guess would be to start with 8 small to medium tomatoes and make the salsa as directed. Taste it and use your best judgement as to if it needs more tomatoes or not.

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