“homemade green salsa recipe -the best homemade mexican salsa recipe”

Thanks for the savory recipe Jocelyn – I don’t always read your posts if the subject line is sweet as I already have too many temptations of the baking kind!! Thanks for the canned idea – will use organic tomatoes myself!

Sadly, I just put up all my hot peppers yesterday so there won’t be any salsa for me. But I am printing and stashing this recipe for next fall when I’m up to my eye teeth in peppers and tomatoes again. Love the change to smoked paprika – it’s one of my favorite little game changers in chili and Mexican rice. Really beautiful photo (you know I watch those) and did I hear there’s a new bowl coming??

The recipe is customizable and requires you to stop, taste-test, and tweak based on your own personal preferences. Everyone’s preference for salt, heat, and preferred texture differs. After you’ve blended it and gotten it just right, feel free to stir in a handful of black beans or corn.

Yum. Simple, straight forward. This tastes like what I grew up with in Texas. It is exceptional with garden-fresh tomatoes. But sadly, the flavors wane substantially after just 1 day – make enough for now, but don’t bother saving the leftovers – they will be mediocre tomorrow.

Drop 4 or 5 tomatoes at a time into the boiling water. Wait 2 minutes then remove from water using a slotted spoon. Slip the skins off (set them aside to make tomato powder), place tomatoes in a colander, and repeat until all tomatoes have been skinned. Discard water.

Sep 25, 2008 Very good! I was worried about the whole lemon qdoba green salsa recipe you did not taste any of the white bitter part of it. Our tomatoes were on the sweet side so our salsa had a sweet/warm taste to it. We’ll be making this one again. Made for *Zaar Cookbooks Tag 2008* game. *Update* I made this again today. This time I did not cut the ends of the lemon off up to the inside of the fruit, and I did not chop the lemon up as fine as the first time, both a mistake. So cut the pith off both ends and then grind/chop the rest of the lemon up fine.

So I made the salsa the other night. Everyone loves it. I added a extra haberno and one extra tomato paste. Squeezed out 6 pints. First time making salsa and your recipe nailed exactly what I was looking for. Thanks again

So. We’ve established that I am a fan of ALL salsas. But if you made me choose my favorite variety, I would have a few criteria: (1) classic tomato salsa (2) with no sugar (I prefer savory salsa, much like I prefer savory corn bread!).

Hi Linda. About a year ago I got into family history work, so I can actually answer your question. My Yeager (Jaeger) ancestors originally came from Faltz Germany. They left in 1766 to settle the Norka river area in Saratov Russia, taking Catherine the Great up on her “generous” relocation offer. After years of struggle, many started leaving the area. My great grandparents left in 1890 to come to the U.S. They settled in Portland, OR. Others settled in Denver. So we may not be direct ancestral relatives, but could be connected somewhere along the lines.

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This looks fantastic. I will definitely try the blender method to save preparation time. However, I would recommend using fresh ingredients rather than canned for a healthier and fresher flavor…always!

I first made this fresh, fruity salsa for a family baby shower. Everyone wanted the recipe. Now, someone makes this juicy snack for just about every family gathering—and I have to keep reminding everyone who introduced it! —Jessica Robinson, Indian Trail, North Carolina

Combine whole tomatoes, Rotel, onion, jalapeno, garlic, sugar, salt, cumin, lime juice, and cilantro in a blender or food processor. Pulse until you get the salsa to the consistency you’d like—I do about 10 to 15 pulses. Test seasonings with a tortilla chip and adjust as needed.

This is the perfect amount of measurements to suit our taste, but feel free to adjust the lime juice or cilantro to your liking. With the tablespoon of fresh chopped jalapeno, it gives a nice kick to it without feeling overpowering. Feel free to adjust.

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