“homemade green salsa recipe +homemade sweet and spicy salsa recipe”

Awesome! Thanks Snick. I’m so glad you guys liked the salsa. It is a tasty recipe for sure. Welcome to the “ex-runny salsa club!” You should try my peach salsa recipe too. It may be even more delicious. http://thebaldgourmet.com/recipe-canned-peach-salsa-with-lime/

I’ve never seen a salsa recipe like that – and it’s a good thing! I love the creativity of this recipe, and I think my favorite part is the charring of the vegetables. I bet that really amps up the flavor! Great recipe, Amy!

Hi Heather – from all the reading I did on that recipe, the lady who created the recipe, Annie, developed it and had it tested at her local extension office years ago. There are a lot of threads on the Garden web forum – I looked for a few minutes and couldn’t find the original thread I had read but here’s a couple that might help (there’s LOTS of discussion on there about the proper way to make the salsa without messing up the pH levels and making it unsafe):

It only takes one to two pulses to get the perfect {in my opinion} salsa. Not too runny… not too thick and chunky. Now either eat right on the spot or place it in the fridge for whenever you’re ready to serve.

I am a proud to be a member of Sunday Supper Movement. A group dedicated to bringing families around the dinner table. And I feel strongly that we should only purchase Wild Caught American Shrimp. . [read more]

Hi there! This salsa looks wonderful and it might be exactly what my husband is looking for (something less “tomato-y” on his taste buds). I’m wondering though if there is a good way to make a smaller amount to test it out. Would cutting everything in half work or would that alter the taste too much? I’d appreciate any thoughts or wisdom you have to share! 🙂 

With tomatoes so abundant in gardens and Farmer’s Markets right now, why not make a batch yourself? You don’t even need to can it — this freezes well so you can enjoy the taste of summer all year long!

Once the garlic is in the pot, add the remaining ingredients. Bring to a boil then reduce the heat and boil gently for 30 minutes. Stir often, making sure it doesn’t burn on the bottom (TIP: cheap, thin-bottomed stock pots tend to burn, but thicker-bottomed pots don’t – it’s worth it to pay a few dollars more. #lessonlearned).

Just made this recipe and it is amazing salsa. I used the tomato paste and sauce as well as chopping my home grown tomatoes in a food processor (very brief chop!). This sauce has great flavor and this will be my go to recipe for red salsa. Thanks so much for sharing this recipe.

“My mother-in-law shared this recipe with me,” comments Mary Blott from Mukwonago, Wisconsin. “Almost every time I ask, what I can bring to a party, I’m told to bring this crunchy colorful salsa.” TIP: “For the best results, prepare and serve it on the same day.” recommends Mary. “And you may want to make a double batch, because a single batch just won’t do.

Hi Jenn, with only a tablespoon of sugar in the entire batch I have no idea why it would have been too sweet. It may just seem sweet because it wasn’t hot and perhaps hot salsas are what you’re used to? The heat factor is related to the jalapenos – did you see the recipe note about the membranes? That’s where they heat lies so if you want a hot salsa leave the membranes intact. Be sure also to use the freshest jalapenos you can find, otherwise they tend to lose some of their heat.

This is a good basic fresh salsa recipe and I keep the tomato juice out by using roma tomatoes as they are easy to seed and you have less juice to contend with. I like using the Serrano pepper for a little different flavor, and use chopped green onions when I have them. This is an easy recipe to alter for your own specific taste.

I’ve never attempted to use canned tomatoes in the recipe, and can’t remember the last time I purchased store tomatoes, so I’m not sure how much liquid is in there in proportion to the fruit. My best guess to make this work would be to drain the tomatoes and then weigh them – but this would be a little high since the starting weight with raw tomatoes includes skins, seeds and excess juice that’s removed/drained off. Maybe around 16-80 pounds drained tomatoes? When I’ve drained my tomatoes after chopping, I end up with around 7 quarts in volume. There is no simple answer, unfortunately. If you give it a go, you may way to get pH strips to test the finished salsa and make sure the pH is below 4.6 for https://great-salsa.com/blog/ canning. If not, you could freeze, or add more vinegar.

You need to taste it first, start with a smaller amt of jalapeños, take a couple of teaspoons of the mixture and place in a cup then put the cup in the freezer for 2 to 3 minutes- then sample…. If you like it then boil 20 to 30 minutes, if not then add more jalapeños and repeat freezer test until you reach the desired hotness. ( it tastes spicier when it is hot, that is why you do the freezer test. Works every time!

I made this recipe for the first time last week and just finished making batch number 3 and 4! We LOVE it! And so do all of our friends! It’s so simple, delicious, and not to mention CHEAPER!! I always have most of these ingredients on hand anyway. Thank you!

It looks good, fresh, but a little too blended. We like our SALSA chunky! Plus we make 3 different temperatures…SISSY, FIRE IN THE HOLE, AND LAVA JOE!!! Plus you can cook with our salsa as well…spaghetti, chili, red beans and rice to mention a few. Check out After Midnight Salsa online, or on Facebook when you have time…. Great recipe thought Mtn Momma 🙂 Jimmy

Basically, everything is going to go into a big pot to be cooked. It doesn’t really matter in what order the ingredients go into the pot. I tend to put the vinegar, tomato paste and spices in first, if only because I’m afraid I’ll forget them at the end and have an incredibly boring (and unsafe) batch of salsa!

So I made the salsa the other night. Everyone loves it. I added a extra haberno and one extra tomato paste. Squeezed out 6 pints. First time making salsa and your recipe nailed exactly what I was looking for. Thanks again

Rachel, you can substitute jalapeños for the serrano chiles and get great results. Try the recipe with 2 jalapeños and if the salsa is too spicy reduce it to one. Removing the seeds and veins from the chiles reduces the heat too. Cheers!

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