“homemade gourmet black bean salsa recipe +homemade non chunky salsa recipe”

I cut this recipie in half and we don’t like green bell peppers but added radishes. Can I do that? Also, in cutting this recipie in half, I used 3 Serrano peppers and 1 jalapeño. I also forgot the tomato sauce as I just didn’t see it and I added 6 oz of tomato paste. I really cut everything in half but as far as changes I’m not sure if they are safe changes or not because I don’t know alot about canning salsa other than I really want to. Can you please help me out?

I canned 20 half-pints of your recipe today and tonight I’m already down to 18. The kids and their friends raved how it was the best salsa they ever tasted. I added three habs to the second batch and it had a pretty good kick.

So it’s January in Michigan. What can I say? It’s my least favorite month of the year. The holidays are over, there is little sunshine… not to mention it’s cold and snowy outside which makes me want to curl up on the couch with a box of Oreos and watch dvr’d Lifetime movies. I needed a quick summer fix to make me feel better.

Before I get started with those, I soak all my peppers in a sink full of water with a squirt of Biokleen produce wash (see my review here). The peppers were too floaty, so I sunk them with the tomatoes, thus multitasking my sink anyway.

Note that it is the vinegar in the salsa ingredients that make this salsa safe for canning using a water bath canning method. Tomatoes are already slightly acidic, and only need a little more acid to be safely canned using this method. But the chiles are not acidic, so they need more vinegar.

Just wanted to let you know my family and I LOVE this salsa! I have pinned it and made it a few times, but I am including it in a post on my blog about my garden harvest this year! I especially love the convenience of it in the winter, (I live in Minnesota) because I don’t need to have fresh tomatoes, I just use my canned ones from the summer before!

Spicy Version: Let me also tell you that we like things spicy, so this recipe it not for someone that likes things on the mild side. However, the recipe can be adapted by decreasing the amount of spicy ingredients you add. In my opinion this is one of the best salsas I have tasted and reminds of the salsa you get at really great Mexican restaurants…not to mention it is definitely far better than the bottled versions at the grocery store. Recipe found at My Baking Addiction.

Once the garlic is in the pot, add the remaining ingredients. Bring to a boil then reduce the heat and boil gently for 30 minutes. Stir often, making sure it doesn’t burn on the bottom (TIP: cheap, thin-bottomed stock pots tend to burn, but thicker-bottomed pots don’t – it’s worth it to pay a few dollars more. #lessonlearned).

I did make it and it was delicious.   I actually froze the tomatoes until I had time to use them.  I washed them and froze them whole in gallon size freezer bags.  When time to use, I defrosted tomatoes on counter top  for about two hours,  the skin came off easily and chopping the tomatoes up wasn’t a mess because it was still semi frozen.  This method worked perfectly actually.  Then I followed the instructions for this recipe.  The salsa turned out perfect.  Very tasty.  I canned several for later enjoyment.  Excellent recipe, thanks for sharing!

The USDA says the only change you can safely make in this salsa recipe is to change the amount of spices and herbs. Do not alter the proportions of vegetables to acid and tomatoes because it might make the salsa unsafe. Do not substitute vinegar for the lemon juice.

I do have a question though – does this recipe meet or pass any specific canning requirements for salsa? Last year it didn’t stick around long but this year if I make multiple batches some jars may hang around a little longer than others and I’m always paranoid about the safety of canning salsa. (I never give it away unless its fresh and I know they’ll eat it right away…) Any comments would be appreciated!

Probably a silly question…I’ve received a large quantity of tomatoes from a generous neighbor. Not familiar with canning, but would it cause any problems to can large quantities of this salsa, instead of just canning the tomatoes? Thanks in advance!

Yes, I get 4-5 pints normally, though it does seem to depend on if I’m exact with the tomato measurements. For example, I always weigh them first and then cut and core – maybe I’m losing more flesh when I seed them, or having to cut some spots off. Then after processing if I’m 1/2 cup or so more than the measured amount, I throw them in, since the tomatoes are the acidic veggie and so more can be added. Lots of variables when canning!

Brighten up your favorite main dishes by adding fresh Serrano-Cilantro Salsa. We love serving this as a topping on our savory flank steak Suadero Tacos. Cooking the serrano peppers along with diced onion and garlic brings out a smoky flavor. Be sure to process the pepper mixture and the rest of the ingredients in order to make sure this salsa is totally dippable.

Organic spices are great if you can get them. To me, the flavors and aromas seem more intense than their conventional counterparts. More grocery stores are starting to stock bulk organic spices, allowing you to stock up on a quality product at a great price, or you can buy them online.

Super Fast Blender Salsa: Buy up cases of tomatoes when they go on sale. If you can’t find cheap tomatoes with jalapenos, buy a jalapeno separately and use plain diced tomatoes. A lemon can swap in for the lime also. Use up some of the tender cilantro stems to save extra money here. Recipe found at Prudence Pennywise.

Thank you for this great recipe. Best purple tomatillo salsa recipe in the World of Salsa….. Just getting ready to make a few more batches now. Boys raided my pantry last year a few times so I definitely will be making more this year after the great harvest we had in the tomato garden!!!!

I think others felt the same way, because a recipe soon appeared on the USDA website for a Tomato-Tomato Paste Salsa. It called for two 12-oz cans of tomato paste and 2 cups bottled lemon juice instead of vinegar, which produced a thick sauce and minus the overly vinegar taste.

My cooked salsa is similar to yours. I cook my salsa in the oven (in my deep roasting pan) at about 300 degrees and there is never a worry about scorching. Also, by cooking it in my big roaster I can make a much larger quantity.

The cumin is the secret ingredient. You definitely can’t leave it out else it tastes like tomato sauce that went bad. I substituted sugar for honey and added green onions and used lemon instead of lime. it was delicious.

I really believe that salsa is best when only a few key ingredients are involved. While there are literally millions of salsa recipes, many with dozens of ingredients, I still believe in my mantra, that simple is always best. For my salsa recipe I like to stick with the key ingredients, which in my book are tomatoes, garlic, onions, cilantro, chiles or jalapeños and a little bit of lime juice for some tanginess.

I just made this using jalapeños instead of serrano. I used a larger onion and one more tomato. Now I boiled then simmered but it didn’t get as red as the photo above. Is this normal or did I do something wrong? How do I get that deep red tone?

Hi Alicia – I use about 10 pounds of tomatoes, give or take, which often yields 10 cups of tomatoes (after they’ve been peeled, chopped and drained). I hate throwing out that exact pound amount because so much depends on the variety of tomato and how long they drain, etc, but it’s a good starting place.

Fill your jars up making sure to leave about ½” space at the top.  Put the lids on your jar and then screw on the tops.  After about 10 minutes, check the tops to make sure they are as tight as they can get.  Now just wait for the lids to seal themselves.  If the lid does not seal, you will need to refrigerate your jar and use it within a week.

I am going to try this recipe. I have one but my husband finds it too runny. I don’t like canning so I freeze it. Do you think yours would be fine to freeze as well? I can’t see why not it will probably have extra liquid when unthawing which I can just drain. I just wanted your thoughts.

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