“homemade gourmet black bean salsa recipe -homemade non chunky salsa recipe”

Made this today and it came out very good. Nice, easy recipe. I loved the tip about putting the tomatoes under the broiler for easy peeling, so much easier than dinking around with boiling water and ice baths. I am taking the lazy way out and freezing it in serving portions as I am all “canned out” for this summer. I used the rest of my garden tomatoes, which were a generic slicing type and tons of red grape tomatoes. I didn’t plant any romas this year as they failed last year.

Made this last night and doubled the recipe. It only made 9 pints instead of 12. That’s not my concern though, it was the strong vinegar flavor. Does this dissipate after canning/setting for a period of time? Should I have added more sugar to modify prior to canning? I just didn’t want to have a sweet salsa either.

I started hunting around for recipes, and came up with several that looked promising, but the one I settled on was from PickYourOwn.org. I just checked the link, and they’ve changed the recipe that’s posted, but I’ll be sticking with the one I have. I’m so glad I saved it to my home computer. This makes a mild salsa, thick with tomatoes. In 2013, we made seven batches. The boys love salsa. They are much bigger now than when this post was first written.

I made this last year with home grown walla walla onions and the yellow peppers. The salsa was wonderful although a little sweet. My girlfriend thought maybe the onions and the yellow pepper. Any suggestions as to what I might do to take the too sweet out? Other then that it was the best ever.

Mince 3 cloves of garlic. You can throw them in the processor, too. (Yes, there are 6 cloves here. I’m not throwing caution to the wind, remember I’m doubling the recipe, in order to get 10 to 11 pints out of each canning session.)

Gloria’s addictive salsa showcases the simple textures and flavors of the region: pungent garlic, earthy cilantro, spicy chili and sweet tomato, all of which adds up to a complex, beautifully balanced sauce. This salsa can be made winter or summer, with either fresh or canned tomatoes. We must warn, though, that it comes with a disclaimer: once you’ve tasted authentic Mexican salsa there’s no going back. The fresh flavor will linger in your memory even longer than it lingers on your tongue. After you see how quickly and easily it comes together, you’ll never again buy flavorless jarred salsa!

To finish the tomato prep, dice the tomatoes into small chunks and place in colander to drain off excess juice. We prefer to scrape out most of the seeds and squeeze out excess juice for a thicker salsa. If desired, juice can be strained and drunk, or canned separately for later use.

[…]  Then Pinterest came along and I stumbled upon a “Quick and Easy Blender Salsa” by Mountain Mamma Cooks.  I thought surely this salsa could not be as good as the salsa I put so much effort into.  Well, […]

Making this right this very second. Following exactly to start with..except am throwing in a couple of Thai peppers along with the 4 smallish jalapenos…which I may regret…them things are supposed to be killer hot. I will say, that it is taking significantly longer than the 10 minutes prep time for the water to simmer off (step 2), but I’m in no huge hurry….I have wine.

Every year I plant way more tomato seeds than any one family should, in hopes that a few plants will survive and thrive. I am not known for being the best gardener, yet I do get lucky every now and again.

I’ve been wanting to share it for a long time and finally put a step-by-step canning guide together for those that are new to canning or hesitant to try it (spoiler alert: it’s easy, and I really mean that).

Just a wild guess, but I would think the amount of garlic would be so small that it would be insignificant. Plus, garlic isn’t going to add acid which is the important part. Good tip about hot peppers! 🙂 Katie

I’m hoping Andrea will chime in here about canning this particular recipe but if you are looking for a salsa recipe you might want to check out this Salsa Recipe for Canning that we posted a while back. It’s really good!

Awesome Barb! Glad it turned out so good. I do love this salsa recipe. Your modification ideas sound pretty good too. As for shelf life, I got the base for this recipe in a Better Homes and Gardens book, and mostly just modified the spices and such, so I would say its pretty safe. I’m still eating mine a year after it was canned and I haven’t killed myself off yet! You should be good for a year as well too.

Chips and salsa go together like…well, chips and salsa! So, since you’re planning to make homemade salsa, why not pair it with homemade chips? We’ve got a great recipe for Crispy Crunchy Pita Chips we think you’ll want to try!

The 58 cups is whole, raw tomatoes, and that’s only an approximate volume. I use the weight of tomato pepper salsa recipe tomatoes to tell when I have enough. There’s gaps between them, and cores (stems), skins, seeds, etc that are removed during processing. Once processed, everything fits into a large (8 quart) stockpot.

I made this and it’s amazing! I left Texas about a year ago and have been missing authentic Tex-Mex salsa so much… until I found this recipe! I use 4 jalapenos, and leave some seeds in, to make it a little spicier 🙂

I’m a Catholic wife and mother of four who wants the best of nutrition and living for her family. I believe that God calls us to be good stewards of all His gifts as we work to feed our families: time, finances, the good green earth, and of course, our healthy bodies. I’m the founder and boss lady here at Kitchen Stewardship — welcome aboard!

Then I add canned crushed san marzano tomatoes and green chiles, to layer extra depth into the salsa. The canned tomatoes provide a rustic essence and sweetness that accentuates the fresh produce, while the canned green chiles deliver a smoky quality that fresh peppers are lacking.

Made my second batch today.  First batch was a just over a week ago and yielded 8 jars.  It was quickly apparent this was not enough!! lol   Family is raving about this recipe.  I didn’t add the sugar either time, don’t miss it.    I used the jalepenos with all the seeds and membranes the first time.  Quite spicy but not unbearable.  This time around, I used the seeds and membranes from 3 of 5 of the jalepenos (per batch; I doubled the recipe this time, hoping to keep some in the house for more than a couple of weeks.)  It’s perfect to my taste.. probably a medium to hot level compared to store bought.     My family doesn’t like chunky salsa so I threw the tomatoes in the food processor for a couple of pulses, and used the food processor for the peppers, and onions.  SUCH a great tasting recipe.  All I hear are complaints that we keep running out of nacho chips 😉   Thanks for sharing!!

The vinegar is needed for food safety but you could try subbing in bottled lemon juice (I don’t love the flavor which is why I stick with vinegar) or search for a recipe with a different lineup of ingredients. Sorry you didn’t love it; if I were your neighbor, I’d come take it off your hands. My husband would be thrilled! 🙂

Thank you for the wonderful recipe. Great base & can see making this with a combo of fresh/canned ingredients. I followed your recipe exactly with the exception of adding 1/4 teasp. of sweet agave in place of the honey.

Just found you via Pinterest and the lovely picture of your salsa, which I made as soon as I got home from the store.I just noticed I forgot to add the honey…will remember the next time. This stuff is SO GOOD. I picked up some multigrain chips for this, but can’t stop eating it with just a spoon… Thank you so much for sharing this with us.

It is my belief that you need both fresh and canned ingredients to make the best homemade salsa recipe. I like to start with fresh sweet garden tomatoes, red onion, garlic, jalapeños, cilantro, and lime. Then chop them into a fine grade in the food processor.

Mel, I followed your recipe almost exactly for what it called for except I laid back on the jalapenos, since we don’t like our salsas too hot. Both my husband and I love this recipe and wouldn’t change a thing. Thank you for sharing it with us.

You can leave it out, Lucas, it just won’t be as thick. And you can add more tomatoes, since they are higher in acid, just don’t add more low acid ingredients like onions, chilies, and herbs like cilantro.

Salsa Roja (roasted red salsa): And people, this salsa. PEOPLE. With a lifetime of tasting, sampling, and gorging research on salsa, I have never in my life had salsa this good. Recipe found at One Particular Kitchen.

Thanks, Mell, for this recipe! I love your method of removing the skins from the tomatoes. How close to the broiler do you put the tomatoes? I think I had them too far away. Still had to work at getting the skin off. Thank you!

For mild salsa try hot peppers lower on the Scoville scale, such as poblano or even bell pepper. Remove all veins and seeds. Offer pickled serrano peppers to guests who enjoy fiery salsa. Buy an authentic brand such as Herdez.

I picked this recipe solely on the method for skinning tomatoes. Then I noticed that it sounded like a good recipe! What kind of adjustments are safe to make for canning and personal taste? Can I up the cumin and jalapeños? What about using bottled lime instead of vinegar?

I’ve been searching for a thicker than normal salsa recipe, and I think I’ve found it. What I may attempt at changing is the simmering the tomatoes for 90 minutes on the stove(that’s brutal in the heat of late summer). I think I’m going to try pressure cooking them for 45 minutes instead. This is how I make my lip-smacking marinara, and I am betting this is going to make for tasty salsa as well.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *