“homemade garlic salsa recipe +fresh homemade mexican salsa recipe”

If hand-chopping tomatoes, you cod salsa recipe drain any water that accumulates while cutting them, which helps make a thicker salsa. However, this doesn’t work with the quicker processing method, so the resulting salsa is a bit thinner, but the savings in time totally makes up for it, in my opinion.

Add all ingredients (except optional corn and beans) to the canister of a blender or food processor in the order listed. Pulse or blend on high power until texture is as smooth as desired. If you have a very strong blender, you probably don’t need to pre-chop the ingredients before adding them to the blender, but I do just to make sure I don’t get large random, accidentally unblended chunks of any one ingredient.

My husband does a ratio of 2:1.  Two cans of spicy tomatoes and one can of regular diced tomatoes, drained and pureed to your preferred consistency.  We like to use an immersion hand blender, but if you don’t have one of these, a regular blender works just as well.

Last week my dad made his favorite tomato juice. This week we made and canned some simple tomato and green chile salsa, which I expect will be great to pull out in the middle of winter and munch with some tortilla chips (if the jars last that long, we go through salsa pretty quickly around here.)

This is the BEST salsa! The Verde is great too. I didn’t habe Serranos so used jalapenos. Salsa wasn’t “right” so sent son to store, added Serranos. Perfection! Note i use both peppers in recipe. When people come in and see tomatillos on counter they get very happy! This recipe had enhanced our lives bc it’s great. Freezes well and i can use non gmo organic ingredients. Thank you.

Sugar is added to many spaghetti sauce and salsa recipes to cut the acidic taste of the tomatoes. It won’t make the canning “bad” like forgetting the vinegar would, so as long as you like the flavor – and I bet it will work out just fine – you’re golden! 🙂 Katie

The first time I canned homemade salsa (around 13 years ago, I think), I used recipes from the Ball Blue Book (one batch of each) and some “mild” Tam jalapeno peppers. Those “mild” peppers ate through two pairs of rubber gloves and filled the house with fumes so strong that I could hardly breathe and my husband started tearing immediately as he soon as he entered the house when he came from work. The salsa was thin and watery, strong on vinegar, and not too tasty. I gave up on salsa for quite a few years – I couldn’t put myself through that again.

On the buffet, I noticed an inviting bowl of salsa sitting sitting next to a big bowl of tortilla chips. Bright, fresh, colorful and chunky I raced for a chip to scoop up a bite. Just as I thought…fabulous.  I sought out host, Sandra, to ask her the brand and where to purchase it. To my delight she replied that it was her own recipe and she had made it herself. And best of all, she shared the recipe with me.

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Spicy Version: Let me also tell you that we like things spicy, so this recipe it not for someone that likes things on the mild side. However, the recipe can be adapted by decreasing the amount of spicy ingredients you add. In my opinion this is one of the best salsas I have tasted and reminds of the salsa you get at really great Mexican restaurants…not to mention it is definitely far better than the bottled versions at the grocery store. Recipe found at My Baking Addiction.

A great recipe – thank you so much! A suggestion though – we did the chopping of garlic, onions, peppers, juiced the limes, and toasted/ground the cumin the night before. We put them in fridge but let them come back to room temp before we added them to the tomatoes. It didn’t seem so overwhelming the day of canning. Such a blessing to find this recipe. Thanks again!

Combine tomatoes, red onion, yellow onion, green chilies, lime juice, cilantro, garlic, cumin, and salt in a food processor. Pulse processor until mixture is combined, yet remains chunky. Transfer to a bowl, cover with plastic wrap, and refrigerate at least 1 hour.

COMBINE tomatoes, green peppers, onions, chili peppers, vinegar, garlic, cilantro, salt and hot pepper sauce, if using, in a large stainless steel saucepan. Bring to a boil over medium-high heat, stirring constantly. Reduce heat and boil gently, stirring frequently, until slightly thickened, about 10 minutes.

That’s just what happens with a simple recipe made with natural ingredients. You can pick up each tomatillo, squeeze it to gauge ripeness and peel back the husk to look for bright green skin, but you don’t know how flavorful it really is until you taste it. Add eleven more tomatillos to the mix, plus jalapeño that may or may not be crazy spicy, plus onion and cilantro of varying freshness, and you’ll never make a batch of salsa that tastes quite like another.

I had this in a Restaurant in Guyana, South America and they used fresh tomatoes and garlic that they roasted before blending. It was amazing! Especially with the cassava chips that they served it with!

This recipe looks delicious and I cant wait to try it out with my new blender! I absolutely love my Blender! I have had it about a year and have never had any issues. I have been making all different kinds of meals. I still make a lot of smoothies with it but I have been making my own soups and even peanut butter!

I’m making your salsa today. Your ingredients are right on with the ingredients I use to make it fresh. The only difference for me is, I had an abundance of tomatoes this summer. I cored them and froze them whole. I just put them in my stockpot and will cook them down until the water is just about gone. I’ll use my emulsion hand blender to run through the peels. I’ll add the other ingredients after this, that way I still get a little chunkiness. I did the process yesterday with pizza sauce (canned) and used about 2 gallons of tomatoes. Turned out great.

Yummy! I love making my own salsa. It’s much better than what you can buy in the grocery store. I’ve made several versions and just tried your version. It’s very good! I didn’t have any lime juice but had everything else on hand. It was still very good without the lime juice. 🙂

Hi Cassie 🙂 Nope! You can just chop them and add them to the food processor 🙂 If you really don’t like the skin, feel free to score the bottoms of the tomatoes with a small “x” and blanch them, that way you can peel them. For me, the food processor chops them up finely enough, I don’t even notice that there are skins on the tomatoes.

P.S. Thank you so much for this recipe. The prep and chopping have been so great for me. I retired a year ago after 37 years in education as a teacher and then elementary principal. I was in a real funk with the school starting and all the chopping and smells from the cooking have brought me right out of the funk! THANKS!!

Toss the squeezed (Squozen? 🙂 tomatoes into a colander or drainer, while you work on others. This helps more of the water to drain off.  You may want to save the liquid: if you then pass it through a sieve, screen or cheesecloth, you have fresh tomato juice; great to drink cold or use in cooking!

This recipe is FANTASTIC!!! I have tried others and have not been satisfied with the consistency. This recipe really does end up thick and chunky and delicious. I added some mini-bell peppers (red, yellow, and orange) and only used half the cilantro, (I made a double batch). Almost everything else I left the same and the consistency, flavor and spice was fantastic. I will use this recipe again and again. Thank you so much for posting!

When I used a combination of Roma/paste tomatoes and everyday garden tomatoes (don’t know the exact variety, but in this batch, Romas probably made up about 1/3 of the total amount of tomatoes), I needed almost six pounds of tomatoes to equal 2 1/2 cups of drained tomatoes. That’s because my non-paste tomatoes have a ton of liquid that drains off. Today, I measured 2 pounds of JUST paste tomatoes (about 12-14 small to medium Romas from my garden) and after taking the skins off, crushing lightly and letting drain, I had a little over 1 cup of drained tomatoes to use for this salsa. I do tend to err on the side of over-draining, as an FYI.

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Good, simple recipe that works well. Watch out for the salt content: add just a little then more if you need it. The recipe leaves you with a lot of liquid – it might be a good idea to pour off some before serving.

(((Laurie))) Thank you for this recipe this morning! My guy must have his ESP tuned in because while at the store he asked me to make some salsa for the game and while I didn’t follow your recipe exactly I was happy to have had a fresher to remind me of what ingredients to pick up.

Wife, mom, business owner, volunteer, lover of chocolate, procrastinator of cleaning, experiencing life in my 40’s and not putting off to tomorrow what I’ve wanted to do for a long time. I stop lookin’ and get cookin’ in all areas of life.

You can add corn, but at that point, you would need to pressure can instead of water bath or steam canning. The acidity needs to be at least 5% I believe to be safe for that method. I have made corn and bean salsa and have to pressure can it. I can’t wait to try this recipe. I love salsa and I am always looking for new ones to try.

You can make this salsa as fiery as you like by adding more or less peppers. But whatever you do, don’t leave them out. And because everything goes into the food processor, you can make the salsa chunky or smooth with just a flick of the switch.

UPDATE: Thanks to Janet in the comments for letting me know steam canners HAVE been approved by a national extension office and the National Center for Home Food Preservation for processing times under 45 minutes (here’s the article). 

This is pretty much my exact recipe, only I stopped measuring a long time ago and I’ve never tried using canned tomatoes along with the fresh. Fresh salsa is definitely the way to go. I can’t even eat canned salsa anymore. One thing I do sometimes to add depth is to roast the tomato, garlic, and jalapeno (just throw it all on a baking sheet and let it go for about 20 minutes at 400F, turning once if I’m not feeling too lazy). This in combo with the fresh cilantro and lime juice gets rave reviews. I bet using canned tomatoes would add a similar depth!

There always a debate as to which kinds of tomatoes are the best for making salsa.  The answer is simply this:  The best tomatoes are ripe tomatoes.  Whichever ones you can find that have the most flavor.  If they happen to have a higher water content, that’s fine.  We’ll drain them.

LADLE hot salsa into hot jars, leaving 1/2 inch headspace. Remove air bubbles and adjust headspace, if necessary, by adding hot salsa. Wipe rim. Center lid on jar. Apply band until fit is fingertip tight.

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