“homemade garden salsa recipe -tomato salsa recipe homemade”

Best homemade salsa EVER!! I get compliments from everyone who tries it–including a Hispanic friend from Mexico. I love it and will be growing a huge salsa garden every year for the purpose of making this recipe!

Made this last night and doubled the recipe. It only made 9 pints instead of 12. That’s not my concern though, it was the strong vinegar flavor. Does this dissipate after canning/setting for a period of time? Should I have added more sugar to modify prior to canning? I just didn’t want to have a sweet salsa either.

This is very similar to the salsa I make. I use a combo of Anaheim and jalapenos, which I char on the stove or the grill. I also add a few splashes (I don’t measure either) of red wine vinegar, a splash of olive oil, and half a splash of liquid smoke. Almost like Chevy’s salsa.

I’ve been wanting to try canning, and this seems like a good way to try it. I love salsa and could put it on almost anything. In fact, one of my favorite busy night recipes is to put two chicken breasts and 16 ounces of salsa (usually one whole jar) in a baking dish and bake at 350 for 30 minutes. So easy and delicious. Thanks for sharing.

P.S. Thank you so much for this recipe. The prep and chopping have been so great for me. I retired a year ago after 37 years in education as a teacher and then elementary principal. I was in a real funk with the school starting and all the chopping and smells from the cooking have brought me right out of the funk! THANKS!!

This lively summer recipe can be served with tortilla chips as an appetizer, or with chicken or fish as a fresh and flavorful side dish. Made with corn, black beans, tomato, onion, pepper, and avocado, this salsa has the most amazing balance of textures in a great presentation.

A friend is teaching me to can this year. She had found your recipe and thought it was the best she had ever made so we spent a day making it. We used whatever type hot peppers we found in three different

The way my husband says you can tell about the peppers is if they’re ‘woody’ like with lines on them, brown lines – not bad, just lines, that means they’ve aged more and are really spicy. I don’t use those, I give them to him to eat raw. Sometimes they’re even too hot for him.

I was surfing for a good recipe source & picked a very basic dish. I then looked for one that had not been played with too much, and then I found you & Gloria’s salsa. Success! I also started my food journey at a young age, with my grandmother as my tutor& guide.

Comments from a visitor on July 25, 2010: “Hi, I made Salsa today in record time. Your recipe is outstanding. I precisely followed the instructions, but added fresh cilantro because we like the taste. I filled 8 Jars exact like you suggested. Thanks for the tip to sterilize the jars in the dishwasher. There is an other trick I used: I did not peel my tomatoes, I chopped them (as well as garlic and onions) in the food-processor, no skins to see or taste! Thanks again, great website! Linda”

Recipe from Averie Cooks. All images and content are copyright protected. Please do not use tomato pepper salsa recipe images without prior permission. If you want to republish this recipe, please re-write the recipe in your own words, or simply link back to this post for the recipe. Thank you.

Hi Martha. I haven’t tried, but I don’t see any reason why you couldn’t use green tomatoes. It’s my understanding that green have more acidity than red, so safety shouldn’t be a concern. They are obviously more sour, not being ripe, so you may have to adjust the sugar content accordingly. You may be able to skip the “draining” step as well, being that green tomatoes have less water in them than red rip ones do. Before you bottle and process, taste the batch and adjust your sugar and spices from there. The taste after cooking should be pretty much the same as after processing. Anyhow, if you give it a try, let me know how it turns out. I’m curious to know.

Best part about this recipe, is that I have a supply of great tasting fresh salsa that we’ll be enjoying all Winter.  We’ve already opened one jar and you’d think it had just been freshly made minutes ago.

Okay, you’ll want to break out gloves for this next step. Trust me, you will want gloves for this part. The one time I didn’t use them I couldn’t sleep that night because of the burning sensation in my hands that no amount of washing could remove!

I just made this and it is wonderful. I left the ribs and seeds of half of the jalapeno because I like a little more heat to my salsa but couldn’t have it too hot for my husband (that’s why only half of the jalapeno and not the whole thing – lol). I will never buy jar salsa again as I always seem to have these ingredients on hand and it’s so easy to make. Thanks for the recipe!

So it’s January in Michigan. What can I say? It’s my least favorite month of the year. The holidays are over, there is little sunshine… not to mention it’s cold and snowy outside which makes me want to curl up on the couch with a box of Oreos and watch dvr’d Lifetime movies. I needed a quick summer fix to make me feel better.

Instead of using jalapeno peppers, use Serrano peppers for a better flavor. They are a bit more powerful and spicy so you have to be careful and experiment with how hot you want the salsa to get. My rule of thumb is one medium seedless and veinless Serrano is mild, three with seeds and veins is spicy. You cab adjust the heat by keeping or removing the seeds and veins. Wear gloves and don’t touch your eyes, even hours after you work with the hot peppers of any type. Water doesn’t clean that from your hands, rubbing alcohol does.

Note:  I usually run my jars through the dishwasher and try to time it so they are done and warm when I’m ready to fill jars. Never fill cold jars with hot salsa! The difference in temperatures may cause the glass to break.

I read some comments below and came back for a quick reply.. I noticed someone questioning the sugar in the recipe. Please dont omit it. You cant taste the sweetness at all. It is necessary for the salsa to retain its color in the jars for a longer period of time. My late Mother was a GREAT home-,maker and I will never be quite as good a ‘canner’ as she was, but she swore that if you leave out the sugar, that the salsa will darken quicker.

“This recipe is so close to the Salsa served at Pappasitos that you will swear you are there. Every time I serve this people ask for the recipe. Best part is that it is so easy and doesn’t require fresh tomatoes so it works all winter.”

Just wondering how many jars the expected yield is from this recipe,  I can’t seem to find it anywhere (it’s probably somewhere, I just can’t find it..), and the pictures show 8, sometimes 5.  Im thinking about doubling, just trying to  figure out how many jars I’ll probably need.

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