“homemade fresh garden salsa recipe homemade sweet and spicy salsa recipe”

OMG! Sooooooooo good, my family begs for this! I grew the peppers this summer just for this recipe! I’ve been making it since I found it here awhile ago! Thanks Kelley! I’m putting this on my Christmas gift list! It’s so easy to make that you could make it right before the holidays along with some pretty packaged chips and some specialty beer! Wow! I’m going to give myself that gift!!! 🙂

I think canning is pretty easy, my neighbor taught me how to make and can strawberry jam years ago.  She doesn’t use the boiling water method and neither do I.  If you’re not comfortable with that, follow your canning instructions for a water bath.  More on that later.

The recipe is easy to adjust to your own taste. Do you like chunky or smooth salsa? If you want it chunky, don’t puree it as much and drain the can of tomato before adding it to the food processor. If you like your salsa a bit more smooth and thin consistency, don’t drain the tomatoes. Also, you can make it spicy or mild according to your own preferences. Remove all the seeds and white membranes from the jalapeno for a mild salsa.

This recipe is really Brad’s and I actually posted it a couple of years ago, but we’ve updated the recipe slightly and, of course, the photos too. Garden tomatoes are the star of the show in this salsa, but if you’re not lucky enough to have a garden full of tomatoes, I suggest buying your tomatoes from a Farmer’s Market. You’ll be surprised what a difference in flavor it makes.

Mexican fare only gets better when topped with Anna Yeatts’ colorful Fresh Salsa. The Pinehurst, North Carolina cook uses ripe tomatoes, crisp onion and a touch of minced serrano pepper, making it just as good as a side dish or appetizer with crunchy baked tortilla chips!

I too often forget the air bubble step. You and I should be fine, but it is a better practice to make sure you get the air out, as this could affect the headspace while processing, thus affecting the amount of processing time required to get all the air out. This recipe includes an extra 5 minutes processing time just in case anyway, so you’ll likely be fine with the jars you forgot on. Just try to do on your next batch.

Your Divine One Minute Salsa has been my go to salsa for years, & my whole family loves it! I cannot imagine liking anything better than that, but am interested in giving this new recipe a try. Thx, Mel 🙂

But instead of plain ol’ Monterey Jack (whose beauty is not to be underestimated) or a cheddar/jack blend, I’m breaking out the good stuff. I found these at my precious little smalltown grocery store. First Parmigiano Regianno…and now this.

I just tried this recipe for the first time and it is delicious! My husband and I love spicy so I added 4 habaneros to the batch (seeded of course). It has a great kick but not too much. I also added a bit more cilantro because we love that flavor as well. It turned out great. I will vary the amounts as I continue to use this recipe. Thank you for sharing!

Love this!!! I do the small batches. It does not last long at all. Heading out today to pick up more tomatoes as mine did not do well this summer. But I have 15+ pepper plants still bearing fruit in the middle of October in north east Ohio, from habanero to mexibells to sweets. I use 3 each of 3 varieties from my garden in this recipe. I leave skins on tomatoes and seeds in peppers! I ladle out excess tomato water for later use in other recipes. Once the pint jar is opened it usually ends up empty!!

thanks for the recipe – is it one of the new ball recipes? Anyways… the use of steam canners was approved for use last year by one of the university extension offices, and is on the NCHFP website – with a disclaimer they have been approved for anything under 45 minutes. They added a statement they will be updating their pages to reflect that.

Note that it is the vinegar in the salsa ingredients that make this salsa safe for canning using a water bath canning method. Tomatoes are already slightly acidic, and only need a little more acid to be safely canned using this method. But the chiles are not acidic, so they need more vinegar.

This is very similar to the salsa I have made for years, and which is very good! I have never used rotel OR honey in mine. I may have to try that next time just to see the difference. But one thing I did change a few years back, kinda by accident, is the onion. I started using green onions in place of regular onion, about 3 for one can of tomatoes. They give such a different flavor, and I switched forever. This is my favorite kind of salsa (though almost all are good in their own way), but definitely trying with the honey. Thanks for posting and promoting salsa!

Pura Vida- Wow- thanks for your kind words! And your new house sounds fantastic- and such a deal. What a great opportunity (and work!). And yes, I think your idea to get the garden bed ready for next year is great- just go ahead and add some nice compost to it as you till so it can be working in the soil over the winter (under the weed-killing plastic, of course…).

I read once you can freeze whole tomatoes and use them later.. me being lazy last year decided to do that with my abundance of garden tomatoes. Have you ever tried that? I’m wondering if I can pull them out and make this..?

Wish I did, Tammy. We are actually going to start making some different canned marinara sauces to create the perfect sauce for The Bald Gourmet, so check back again soon. Our garden tomatoes are quite plentiful this year….

I just made a double batch. I liked the look of the recipe, and just jumped in! We grow heirloom tomatoes, so I used green zebras, sunny orange ane black plums. Since they are much jucier than Romas, I drained off a lot of liquid and boiled it down, then added it at the end. Worked great. Thanks Katie

Hi Carl. I wouldn’t worry too much about it. The skins won’t really hurt anything other than the texture. Skimming them off the top sounds like a good idea, but I wouldn’t worry too much if you don’t get them all. Glad you’re trying the recipe.

Use a ladle to fill the hot jars with the hot salsa, leaving ¼ inch head space. Close the lids and place the jars in a boiling water bath for 15 minutes. Make sure the jars are fully submerged under water with several inches of water above them. Remove the jars and let them rest undisturbed for 24 hours before moving them.

Cover the canner and bring to boil over high heat. Once water boils vigorously, continue boiling for 15 minutes at altitudes of less than 1,000 ft. (adjust processing time for your altitude if necessary).

During processing, a vacuum is pulled in the headspace of the jar. This vacuum naturally pulls down the lid. (Giving us that distinctive “popping” noise when the jars seal.) On Tattler lids, you manually screw down the lids at the end of processing. This may create a false seal where the air in the headspace has not been properly evacuated, leading to food spoilage. More on that here – https://commonsensehome.com/comparison-of-jarden-and-tattler-lids/

I always get asked what kind of crackers/chips I eat with dips. There is only one possible answer: Mary’s Crackers from Mary’s Gone Crackers. I am obsessed/in love/can’t picture my life without them. I quit eating gluten about a year ago and to date I haven’t found any gluten-free crackers that taste better than Mary’s Crackers. P.S. I’m not paid to say any of this, I just really, really love them.

This paul newman black bean and corn salsa recipe my favorite salsa in the entire world! It’s been way to long since the last time I made it and now it was stuck in my head and I was craving salsa in a bad way. Well, that and watching some Nora Roberts books-made-for-TV movies. You know the ones.

I also really love creamy avocado salsa verde, which you can make by throwing some diced avocado into the mix. I decided to divide my salsa in two and blend one avocado into one-half of the salsa. I’ve included instructions below. Or, serve it alongside my favorite guacamole recipe with tortilla chips for the best of both worlds!

i currently just moved to belgium and i was wondering what you can substitute for some of the ingredients? i know it makes my spices limited, but if you (or anyone reading could help, i would be most grateful) most specifically: 1- 10 oz can original Rotel.

Cook the salsa until it’s nice and hot (boiling), and then follow the instructions I posted yesterday for canning tomatoes to fill and process the jars. If it seems too juicy, you can always boil off some of the water first.

4Ladle hot into clean, hot jars, leaving ½-inch headspace. Remove air bubbles, adjust headspace if needed, and wipe rims with a dampened clean paper towel. Adjust lids and process 15 minutes using a boiling water bath method. At altitudes of 1000 feet or higher, increase processing time 1 minute for each 1000 feet of altitude.

“awesome recipe: I used 1 large can diced tomatoes drained, and 2 cans fire roasted tomatoes-only 1 drained. added 1/4 tsp cumin and 1 TBLSP fresh squeezed lime. did not do the peppers in a pan. I just pulsed them with the rest of the other ingredients. absolutely loved it. just want to know how well this recipe does when canning in a hot water bath. thank you soooooo much.”

LADLE hot salsa into hot jars, leaving 1/2 inch headspace. Remove air bubbles and adjust headspace, if necessary, by adding hot salsa. Wipe rim. Center lid on jar. Apply band until fit is fingertip tight.

1) Use a tested recipe. Canning is a great and fun (yes, I’m a nerd) way to preserve food and keep it on your shelves, but there are many food safety concerns related to canning and it’s important to use a recipe that’s been tested to ensure the pH levels are safe over time.

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