“homemade corn and tomato salsa recipe +homemade salsa recipe 5 minutes”

There is not a better time to make large quantities of tomato sauces or salsas. Canning is often the preferred method to store sauces for use later, but freezing is also an option which many prefer—especially those who have large freezer space. (Our directions below can be used for freezing or canning; see the note about canning at the end.)

It only takes one to two pulses to get the perfect {in my opinion} salsa. Not too runny… not too thick and chunky. Now either eat right on the spot or place it in the fridge for whenever you’re ready to serve.

As with all canning recipes, this recipe has been developed and tested specifically to make sure the pH level is safe for canning. Don’t alter the amount of acidity (vinegar). You CAN substitute some of the vinegar for bottled lemon juice if you want to play around with flavor. Dried spices won’t affect pH, so you can also experiment with those, but the amount of vegetables and tomatoes and acidity need to stay the same. I have not canned this recipe in a pressure canner, but I have given details in the post above about steam canners vs. water bath canners. Please do your own research to decide what method is best for you.

Below in a comment from early August it said to get the 10 cups it would be about 8-12 tomatoes. I used about 30 medium size roma type tomatoes (filled 2 large sheet pans) and after peeling, chopping and draining I only end up with 6 cups of tomatoes. Did you meant o say 8-12lbs and not tomatoes or am I doing something wrong ? I ask because I change the ratio of ingredients off of that and do not want to mess the PH if somehow I am measuring wrong though not sure how I would be.

Howdy! I’m Corey, and I’m so happy you’re here! This blog is full of my love of food, photography, family & friends. Have fun looking around! I hope you find a couple yummy recipes to try. Read more about the family here…

Brittany Dixon is a former health coach turned stay at home mom of two girls. Her goal is to share her passion for healthy eating and natural living alongside the daily challenges and triumphs of motherhood. She is excited to step into the world of homeschooling and continue to share her life through recipes, anecdotes and future travels with her family.

Not sure what went wrong with my salsa.. followed recipe to a T and mine turned out an orangey color and pulsed on low for maybe 20-30 seconds & it’s very runny. Looks nothing like the photos and doesn’t taste like I hoped it would. 🙁

This sounds good. I usually make a salsa with both canned and fresh tomatoes plus the lime (my kids love the lime more than I do). I think I will try this one as mine is great but not quite “restaurant” tasting.

This recipe uses specific amounts of ingredients, balancing the non-acidic ingredients with the amount of added acid needed to make the recipe safe. Do not increase the amount of green chiles beyond 1 1/2 cups, or decrease the amount of tomatoes less than 7 cups.

I haven’t tried so I can’t say for sure what to do exactly but why don’t you just toss some in the blender with the other ingredients, blend, taste..and take it from there based on what you think the salsa needs. Pretty easy 🙂 Enjoy!

Hey Tiffany! Thanks for your response! Funny that you made the comment that you loved my attitude – I was in the hospital for 3.5 weeks & had a # of nurses who said to me they loved coming to my room because I knew their names & made them feel welcome when most patients ignored them! Attitude is everything! & nurses rock! Thanks to the good wishes & prayers of people like you & perseverance like our James said with the help of OT’s PT’s I have most of the use of my arm & hand back ( hallelujah!) & am walking w/a cane. Hope Rachael’s journey to a new home is quick & successful! Thanks!

First time making salsa and this looks awesome. But I have what maybe a silly question. You drained tomatoes for 30 min. then put in large pan and bring to boil, Do you have any water in that pan or just the drained tomatoes, and if so how do you keep them from burning to bottom of the pan? Novice here thanks for patience.

Using an immersion blender or food processor, carefully purée the salsa to a smoother consistency. In a food processor and working in batches, pulse 8 – 10 times and when all finished, return to the pot. Taste for seasonings and if too vinegary, add another tablespoon or so of sugar. If too sweet, add a little more vinegar to balance. Bring blended salsa back to a boil and simmer a few more minutes.

I absolutely love this recipe.  I made a double batch and it tasted fabulous and the consistency was perfect.  I was wondering what you would add to this recipe to make a medium heat salsa?  Thank you, thank you, thank you!

Love, love,love your easy ideas for putting up and preserving fresh produce. I did send a note previously to say learning from my mom( bless her heart) was awesome, but tedious. Now, with your site, I can still do a lot of preserved foods, without all the work. That to me means the world. Thank you again,

1 large jalapeño, stem and most of seeds removed (Like it super spicy? I would start with one, then taste and add another if needed. It’s got pretty decent heat at this level, and the heat increases as it sits.)

Drop 4 or 5 tomatoes at a time into the boiling water. Wait 2 minutes then remove from water using a slotted spoon. Slip the skins off (set them aside to make tomato powder), place tomatoes in a colander, and repeat until all tomatoes have been skinned. Discard water.

I just want to let you know this is now my go to recipe for salsa. My husband says I’ve ruin him for ever eating jar salsa again after eating this and it’s my summer go to recipe when I have guests come iver swimming. Thx for sharing I’ve been using this recipe for two years now and it’s a real crowd pleaser and no fail!

I have to admit I’m sort of a snob when it comes right down to it. I only like fresh salsa. Some of you may not notice or even care even that there is difference, but to me there’s as obvious difference. To me, the jarred kind tastes like an overly chunk-defied pasta sauce *ack*. The only way I can control how thin or thick I want it… is by making it myself and I prefer it fresh with small chunkage. Honestly salsa isn’t hard to throw together and it makes a lot so it really is cost effective! You just need a food paul newman black bean and corn salsa recipe

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