“homemade black bean and corn salsa recipe _homemade tomato salsa recipe for canning”

This salsa is amazing! I made it last year but didn’t leave a comment, probably because I was too busy eating all the salsa. Just finished a batch today and thought I would add my two cents that I used about 18 pounds of roma tomatoes to get the 10 cups for this recipe. Perfect salsa every single time! I used 5 jalapenos and it has just a hint of heat, which is perfect for me, a self-proclaimed spice wimp. Thanks for another fool-proof recipe, Mel!

Ball Canning is a good place to start, but I doubt you’ll enjoy the excessively pickled flavor. But you have to learn to walk before you can run. Buy a pressure canner. It’s the only way to make home canned salsa using lower amounts of lime juice as a preservative. Research: Annie’s Salsa for some direction.

Add just 1/4 cup chopped onion to the bowl. This doesn’t seem like a lot, considering that in my Pico de Gallo recipe, I preach and preach about how important it is for the onion to receive equal billing with the tomatoes. But for this salsa, it’s best to go subtle with the onions.

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In the event that some of your jars do not seal properly, you can reprocess them. To do so, remove the band and lid and empty your salsa into a saucepot. Reheat them by bringing them up to a boil, then ladle them into a clean, hot jar as before. Place a new, hot lid on the jar (make sure you wipe the rim off!), hand-tighten the band, and process them again for the full fifteen minutes.

Haha! I can totally relate to that. This last Summer I canned up a STORM. It was my first time canning and even though I was excited about all of the jars full of different goodies, I was kind of nervous about actually eating and of it! So, in a streak of paranoia, I had my husband consult a colleague of his who is a pathologist. I figured since he is an expert on germs he ought to know about the safety of eating canned goods. The pathologist said that as long as the lid hasn’t popped it’s completely safe and he wouldn’t hesitate to eat it or feed it to his own kids. That made me feel a whole lot better 🙂 We’ve been enjoying all the jams, relishes, pickles, apple sauce, and salsas since and…we’re still breathing! Go for it, Tori!

Hi Heather – from all the reading I did on that recipe, the lady who created the recipe, Annie, developed it and had it tested at her local extension office years ago. There are a lot of threads on the Garden web forum – I looked for a few minutes and couldn’t find the original thread I had read but here’s a couple that might help (there’s LOTS of discussion on there about the proper way to make the salsa without messing up the pH levels and making it unsafe):

Hi, I noticed my comment was not posted and hence no response. Would you be so kind as to answer my question privately? I’m an American living in The Netherlands who really misses good salsa! I would love to make this salsa to store away for the winter but am wondering the shelf life.

This recipe is bursting with flavor! It is fresh and spicy, and did I mention easy? This is the closest thing to restaurant style salsa you will find. The jalapenos and hot pepper sauce (e.g., Tabasco) add spice to the mix and the cilantro, lime juice, and green onions create freshness.

I made this salsa exactly as the recipe stated with all home grown ingredients. I didn’t want to stray from the recipe since I spent so much effort in growing all the produce in it. There was one small exception in that I used orange peppers instead of green peppers since my green peppers were not ready to harvest. This salsa is incredible! Best I have ever tasted. My sons are salsa fanatics and they fought over the last jar! So often recipes don’t turn out to taste as one would hope but this surpassed all expectations. Plus it is so easy! I am making a double batch as we speak so I can give some to my boys to take to college with them.

In a food processor or blender, I combine a can of diced tomatoes, a can of Rotel which is seasoned diced tomatoes with green chilies, 1/2 of a small onion, 1/2 of a jalapeno, lime juice, garlic, cilantro, honey and a few spices. Pulse for 30 seconds and that’s it. I’ve been known to throw in half a cucumber and a carrot before too. This is the kind of salsa that you can’t really screw up. You can follow the recipe below as a guideline and do as you like to make it your own.

My mouth is watering by just looking at these pictures! I will definitely going to try it this weekend. Thank you very much for the awesome recipe! Your YouTube video is so fun to watch. You deserve more subscribers and more views! Keep the awesome vides coming!

Oh I’m glad you posted this! My friend said she freezes her garden tomatoes as they become ripe and turns them into salsa and what not so I’ve been throwing them in my freezer and was scared it would ruin it! Yay!!

C Call, I think you’re a little confused on pH levels. From canning 101: “The way food scientists determine whether something is high or low in acid is by pH. If something has a pH of 4.6 or below, it is deemed high in acid and is safe for water bath canning. If the pH is 4.7 or above, it is considered low in acid.” This salsa registers at 4.0 – which is below 4.6 – so it has an even higher acidity level than is necessary to be safe. In other words, this salsa is well within the limits for safe canning.

I’m sure it would be fine to can as long as you know what you’re doing when it comes to canning. I think there is a specific process you have to go through with the cans. I’m sorry I’m not more help, but I’ve never tried canning. Every year I tell myself I’m going to can salsa, but I never get around to doing it. I would google canning salsa, so at least you know the process. Good luck!

I would just like to say this salsa is the best thing i’ve discovered through pinterest. Found it probably 4 years ago and just wanted to comment and say thank you! I make it ALL the time and everyone loves it!!! Thanks for such an awesome EASY recipe!!

This is absolutely the first salsa I’ve ever made, and canned. Perfect! The best I’ve tasted. I’ve just begun gardening, and was able to use all ingredients from my own garden. Successful and delicious!

Allowing tomato-based recipes like this to get cold and quiescently congeal is important. My very first batch is sitting in the refrigerator right now. It is a bit runny, but I’m not draining off those flavor-infused juices. No need to.

I agree about the vinegar- my husband tasted it and said he can’t eat it because of how strong the vinegar is. So I’m kind of sad because it took me a really long time to make this. I am sure it will get eaten, but I’d be interested in a recipe without the vinegar if that’s possible. I loved this method of peeling the tomatoes, much less painful.

Below in a comment from early August it said to get the 10 cups it would be about 8-12 tomatoes. I used about 30 medium size roma type tomatoes (filled 2 large sheet pans) and after peeling, chopping and draining I only end up with 6 cups of tomatoes. Did you meant o say 8-12lbs and not tomatoes or am I doing something wrong ? I ask because I change the ratio of ingredients off of that and do not want to mess the PH if somehow I am measuring wrong though not sure how I would be.

We canned, labeled, taste tested, did follow-up surveys. We, our families, and our friends were the discerning critics for the process. Of the 6 recipes whose performance in previous canning adventures had qualified them to participate in this competition, this salsa was the clear winner!!! Every taste tester liked the salsa at each step – fresh, canned for a while, canned for a year. In fact, we had to keep back a single (hidden and disguised) bottle to use for the “canned for a year” competition. Our tasters loved this recipe so much that while there were plenty bottles of the other recipes around, this recipe was searched for every time they craved salsa. It is also very pretty in the jar; which, may be superficial, but is also satisfying at the end of the canning day!

“My husband and I love fresh salsa, so we decided to try making our own. We just started by adding ingredients, till it tasted the way we wanted. Since then, we have been growing a SALSA GARDEN in the backyard, so we can enjoy our homemade salsa all summer long!!”

Plus, tomatoes, at least, are healthier when cooked because heat releases the lycopene. So I’m more than happy to preserve fresh produce in my canner when it’s salsa, of which we can never have too much. (If you’d like to know more about fermentation, however, HERE is an amazing eCourse on the subject with almost 2 dozen multimedia lessons.)

Found this via Pinterest and my family ADORES it. They keep asking for me to make it. I’ve reduced the jalapeno quite a lot (I live with a bunch of wimps who can’t handle spicy stuff) but it’s absolutely perfect otherwise! Thanks so much.

This tomato salsa recipe for canning is packed with tomato, peppers, onions, and just enough spicy tingle to tickle your taste buds. Open a jar any time and enjoy with tortilla chips or with your favorite Mexican inspired meals.

Oven canning is not recommended. Although the temperature range is similar (or higher in an oven), convective heat transfer (air to jars) does not work as well as conductive heat transfer (water to jars). Odds are you’d damage the sealant on the ring before getting safe internal temperatures throughout the salsa.

No one in my family likes bell pepper.   Since you caution to keep quantity of veggies the same, do you have a suggestion for sonething to use instead.  Or, could I increase the tomato by a cup and the onion by 3/4 a cup to make upbfor the 1 3/4 cups bell pepper?

The pressure cooking idea worked out good but would work out better if I had only made the single recipe. I didn’t drain the tomatoes while prepping them; rather, I drained them for a few minutes after coming out of the pressure cooker. Next batch I make, I’m going to cook the tomatoes in the pressure cooker for 45 minutes, drain and add all of the ingredients back into the pressure cooker(one less dirty pot is a good thing).

Jars may be reprocessed, but you should check the headspace, wipe the rims clean and probably use new lids if the original ones appear malformed. I wouldn’t put them right back in again, because whatever caused the failure the first time will probably cause a failure again.

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