“fresh homemade salsa recipe cilantro +homemade salsa recipe”

Last November, our company opened up a new branch location in Castle Pines, which is just south of Denver. To celebrate the expansion we threw a little mid-day open house party complete with an impressive array of  food and beverage.

This recipe is perfect! I Played around a little with it but not much. Are used about a quarter tomatillos and three quarters roma tomatoes. I used about 20 lbs total of this mixture.  Are use six Tabasco peppers, because that’s what I had on hand. I roasted the garlic and used nine large cloves. I used a cup and a half of the vinegar to get the pH https://great-salsa.com/category/chiles/ it needed to be (4.5). I processed using a pressure cooker. It was a big hit in our house!

So, here is my favorite salsa. Enjoy! If you make it, make sure to come back here and leave feedback on my blog, I love to hear from you! Also, if you are Instagram, make sure to follow me and tag your creations #thevegan8, so I don’t miss the notification!

If hand-chopping tomatoes, you can drain any water that accumulates while cutting them, which helps make a thicker salsa. However, this doesn’t work with the quicker processing method, so the resulting salsa is a bit thinner, but the savings in time totally makes up for it, in my opinion.

This semi-homemade salsa comes together in a flash. All you need to do is give corn kernals a good char in a skillet for about 2 minutes. Stir the corn into store-bought salsa, add a hearty dose of cilantro, and this so-simple salsa is ready for noshing. We like serving it with our Pork Tenderloin Wraps, but we don’t think you’ll have any problem finding even more unique and interesting ways to serve it up to friends and family. 

Thank you, Jami! That explanation makes perfect sense. I’ve been researching canning a ton and the different acid types for different foods was the only thing that still had me stumped. Friends and family tease me about stressing out over botulism, but that is NOT a risk I am willing to take despite them telling me to “do it just like your grandma did, we loved her stuff” so I was very happy to come across your blog (way too many sites with recipes that are not approved). I had a huge crop of San Marzano tomatoes this year so I can’t wait to make your sauce and salsa (and my tried and true salsa for the fridge – but not to can ;).

I make salsa similar to this when tomatoes are out of season. A suggestion to add more flavor is to roast the jalapeño and roast poblano peppers. I don’t use honey and I just use regular canned tomatoes. If you roast the peppers it adds so much flavor that you will never want to use Rotel tomatoes. My coworkers beg me to bring it to work. Salsa is so easy to make that I always wonder why people buy the jar stuff and making it is cheaper too.

Hi Linda. About a year ago I got into family history work, so I can actually answer your question. My Yeager (Jaeger) ancestors originally came from Faltz Germany. They left in 1766 to settle the Norka river area in Saratov Russia, taking Catherine the Great up on her “generous” relocation offer. After years of struggle, many started leaving the area. My great grandparents left in 1890 to come to the U.S. They settled in Portland, OR. Others settled in Denver. So we may not be direct ancestral relatives, but could be connected somewhere along the lines.

It is very helpful to have canning utensils, such as a jar lifter, lid lifter, wide-mouth funnel, and headspace tool. However, if you do not have these, you can use tongs (to lift jars out of the hot water), a fork or a magnet (to lift lids out of the hot water). Just be very careful not to drop your jars!

I’ve been browsing your Mexican recipes & noticed that cilantro is in just about everything… Problem is I can’t tolerate cilantro (it tastes like SOAP – it’s a hereditary thing). Do the recipes really need this herb? Or is there something else I could substitute?

This is a fantastic and super simple recipe! I doubled the recipe because I consider salsa to be a food group in and of itself and wanted to have some for a few days. I also doubled the jalapeño as I like more kick. I must disagree with one of the other reviewers in that I found the flavor to be better the second day and still better the day after that! So much so that the next time I make it, I will make it the day before I need it so the flavors can meld overnight.

Jami I am a new canner and i have been researching the 15 pints of salsa i recently canned. I did not put lemon juice in, I did not measure ingredients and I used fresh cilantro, and parsley, and then I did all this in a water bath. The more research I do, the more I think I might have to dump all this out and try again.

We served this salsa as a bed for flaky Grilled Grouper, but feel free to serve as an appetizer with chips. Kalamata olives bring a slightly unexpected briny flavor to this salsa, which you won’t be able to resist. 

I made this and mine is more orangeish.. omitted the honey and added a whole jalapeno including the seeds. followed the recipe dead on otherwise.. it’s a little runny too 🙁 Any suggestions to thickening it or making it the deep red color?

O. Em. Gee! I am so super excited I found this. Just poured it out of the blender and I cannot stop eating it. I read the reviews and knew that it was gonna be pretty good but this was above my expectations. Jarred salsa -NEVER AGAIN!! Can’t wait to try this with fresh tomatoes. The recipe is GREAT. BRAVO and thanks for sharing it 🙂 This ones going in my recipe tin FOR SURE!

Thank you so much for sharing such a GOOD recipe! I just made it today and it is yummy! I did, however, swap out the jalapenos for Serrano peppers because that is all I had in my garden. I also swapped out cayenne peppers for ancho chile pepper. I do have a question. I noticed some air pockets and wondered if you ever had an issue with that. I wondered if I somehow made it too thick. I used roma tomatoes. Thank you, again!

The recipe is customizable and requires you to stop, taste-test, and tweak based on your own personal preferences. Everyone’s preference for salt, heat, and preferred texture differs. After you’ve blended it and gotten it just right, feel free to stir in a handful of black beans or corn.

Don’t be fooled: Strawberries are the star here. But, throw in cool and creamy avocado, crunchy baby radishes, lime juice, and cilantro and you’ll have a brand new favorite salsa that will leave everyone at the party asking for the recipe. Serve over our Grilled Chicken Cutlets at dinnertime or with hearty pita chips when you’re looking for the perfect appetizer. 

A dear Mexican friend of mine, whom I will forever be grateful for, had me over for dinner one night a few years ago for some authentic Mexican food. She knew I was missing the good stuff here in Germany. We’re chatting over wine in her kitchen while she is cooking all the food. I noticed she had this on the stovetop:

I have canned a lot of salsa throughout the years with great success. This year I was looking for a recipe that was thick and a little crunchy and fresh tasting. The recipe is excellent and there’s no need to change a thing unless you want a hotter salsa. I can’t recommend the recipe enough!!! Thank you!!!

The name says it all. Awesome salsa, Great flavor. We added serrano peppers in place of the jalapeños to make it a little hotter. Doubling the recipe we canned 7 qtrs. Everyone loves it. Thanks for sharing

I’m making your salsa today. Your ingredients are right on with the ingredients I use to make it fresh. The only difference for me is, I had an abundance of tomatoes this summer. I cored them and froze them whole. I just put them in my stockpot and will cook them down until the water is just about gone. I’ll use my emulsion hand blender to run through the peels. I’ll add the other ingredients after this, that way I still get a little chunkiness. I did the process yesterday with pizza sauce (canned) and used about 2 gallons of tomatoes. Turned out great.

Hi Lauren. Your “small air bubble” batch of salsa should be fine. Eat and enjoy! As for storage time, most canning books tell you to store in a dark cool place for up to a year. That’s sound advice, as canned food starts to loose its nutritional value after that. However, I’ve eaten a few jars of this salsa that were 2 and 3 years old, and they still tasted great and had a good texture. They maybe just weren’t as “fresh” feeling. That all being said, if your gift recipients like salsa, it probably won’t last more than a week or two!

Tomatoes – 10 cups peeled, cored, chopped tomatoes, which takes about about 8 lbs (yes, quite a few – you remove the skins, seeds and a lot of the water, so it takes a lot to start.)  If you only want to make a single jar, see this page instead!

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As if you needed any more good news, this homemade salsa can be prepared in about 5 minutes at any time of year! In the summer it’s delicious with seasonally ripe tomatoes, peppers, and herbs, but it’s also easy to make in the off-season with a can of tomatoes and canned chilies. Don’t let the weather stop you from enjoying fresh chips and salsa whenever a craving strikes…

Start with 5-6 pounds of washed tomatoes. I use about 1/2 slicing tomatoes and 1/2 paste tomatoes- the slicers have some of that great flavor and the paste tomatoes add thickness, so I like to include both.

I grew up in Southern California, so Mexican food has always been one of my favorites. This salsa is extremely mild, so it’s a good choice if you’re trying Mexican food for the first time. It’s also tasty over baked whitefish or sole.

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