“easy homemade salsa recipe blender _homemade chunky tomato salsa recipe”

Love this recipe my husband and I opened a jar before it cooled down and ate the whole thing in one sitting. I come from a long line of homemade salsa junkies and this recipe is my favorite. Thank you!  

Oh this looks delicious Mel! Your recipe is so, so similar to mine! We go through it like it’s water. I made sure I canned plenty last summer to get us through the winter. I have tomatoes coming out of my ears again this year. Looks like I need to get busy! I kind of cheat though and don’t put mine in a steam bath. I just let my salsa come to a boil and keep my jars in a warm oven and the lids in simmering water. I pour the boiling salsa into the warm bottles, then put the lid on and screw the ring on and tip the bottles upside down and let them sit overnight. The lids seal every time. Don’t call the canning police on me !

If you are working alone, you can squeeze the tomatoes and put them to drain in a colander while you prepare the rest of the ingredients. In our kitchen, the boys chop tomatoes while I prep the rest of the ingredients.

I encourage you to try it if you would like a healthier option for seasoning your food that hasn’t been through some terrible processing and adding of chemicals or additives. They also sell unrefined Chancaca sugar that has been produced from molasses, instead of going through an extensive process like most sugars on the market. I’m dying to try that next! You can order any of their products at Karis Naturals.

I’ve been searching for a thicker than normal salsa recipe, and I think I’ve found it. What I may attempt at changing is the simmering the tomatoes for 90 minutes on the stove(that’s brutal in the heat of late summer). I think I’m going to try pressure cooking them for 45 minutes instead. This is how I make my lip-smacking marinara, and I am betting this is going to make for tasty salsa as well.

Toss the squeezed (Squozen? 🙂 tomatoes into a colander or drainer, while you work on others. This helps more of the water to drain off.  You may want to save the liquid: if you then pass it through a sieve, screen or cheesecloth, you have fresh tomato juice; great to drink cold or use in cooking!

I think you could sub lemon juice if you are making small batches and keeping in the refrigerator, but changing out the acidity at that level will affect the overall pH which may make a difference in canning safety, so I can’t say for sure whether it would still be safe to can.

“awesome recipe: I used 1 large can diced tomatoes drained, and 2 cans fire roasted tomatoes-only 1 drained. added 1/4 tsp cumin and 1 TBLSP fresh squeezed lime. did not do the peppers in a pan. I just pulsed them with the rest of the other ingredients. absolutely loved it. just want to know how well this recipe does when canning in a hot water bath. thank you soooooo much.”

I don’t want to overwhelm you with too many details of the canning process in this post, so I’m just providing basic instructions. I highly recommend that you get a copy of the Ball Complete Book of Home Preserving if you’re serious about learning how to can. I also recommend this Ball Canning Utensil Set. The set includes a funnel, jar lifter, lid lifer, and head-space measuring tool.

Wish I did, Tammy. We are actually going to start making some different canned marinara sauces to create the perfect sauce for The Bald Gourmet, so check back again soon. Our garden tomatoes are quite plentiful this year….

This salsa is amazing! I made it last year but didn’t leave a comment, probably because I was too busy eating all the salsa. Just finished a batch today and thought I would add my two cents that I used about 18 pounds of roma tomatoes to get the 10 cups for this recipe. Perfect salsa every single time! I used 5 jalapenos and it has just a hint of heat, which is perfect for me, a self-proclaimed spice wimp. Thanks for another fool-proof recipe, Mel!

Thanks SO much for sharing this recipe! I loved it to so much because it is so easy to whip up right before I head in for a night shift. All the nurses in the ICU love it when I whip up a batch and bring it in.

A. Yes, salsa, tends to be at peak quality for about 6 months, then ok for another 6 months. After that, the USDA says it is still safe to eat as long as the seal is intact, but it darkens and becomes mushier than most people would like! So, if you have an older jar, and there’s no leakage, a good seal, and everything looks ok, open it and try!

For spicy salsa, use a ratio of one hot pepper to three large tomatoes. Rocoto is the chile of choice in Peru, but use any chile available in your area. Add more hot peppers or a pepper higher on the Scoville scale for more heat.

I had save this recipe cause I knew it would be good, and it proved to be the best one I’ve ever made. My ratios of spices and peppers were a little altered, and I had a can of Muir Glen fire roasted, crushed tomatoes which added a little more depth perhaps, but it’s a big winner. I filed this in “Make Again” for sure! Thank you – love your emails.

If you’re looking for a fresh and flavorful salsa, this recipe is an excellent choice. The combination of diced tomatoes, peppers, and garlic make for a classic fresh salsa. Serve it with tacos, burritos, or as a party dip with tortilla roll-ups or tortilla chips. It is a very good condiment to serve alongside grilled or baked fish fillets, grilled chicken, steaks, and pork chops.

Better Yourself, I’m glad you’re going to try this popular salsa recipe. We also love salsa and chips and have tried many, but this is our all-time favorite recipe. You can’t beat homemade. Enjoy and thanks for coming by.

I hope you enjoy it, Katie. Unfortunately citric acid can’t be directly subbed for vinegar in salsa. There are no tested recipes for that. However you can sub bottled lemon or bottled lime juice for the vinegar (same amount) and some prefer that flavor (I think I mention that in the recipe?).

This was so good and so fast!! I didn’t have rotel on hand so I took another posters advice and used two cans of diced tomatoes and doubled the salt and jalapeno. I WILL be making this exactly as the recipe states because I’m sure it’s delicious as is. I am no longer hungry for the taco’s I was gong to make because of this addicting salsa!

Since many of you have asked about a weight measure for the 10 cups of tomatoes, as I’ve been canning the salsa the last few days, I’ve done a little experimenting/research. Basically, I’ve found it varies GREATLY depending on variety. When I used SIX pounds of Roma + every day garden tomatoes, after taking the skins off, lightly crushing, and draining, the yield of tomatoes to use in this recipe was about 2 1/2 cups. When I used TWO pounds of only Roma/paste tomatoes, after taking the skins off, lightly crushing, and draining, the yield of tomatoes to use was a little over one cup. I tend to err on the side of over draining the tomatoes, if anything, so that makes a difference as well. For me, because I usually use paste tomatoes in this recipe, I would plan on around 18-20 pounds (give or take) of Roma/paste tomatoes to get the 10 cups for this recipe…and even more if using tomatoes with a higher water/lower flesh content.

Now I know I had questions about this process last year too but this is what I found out.  If you do not alter the amount of vinegar and tomatoes, the acid from them will be enough to kill the bacteria and if the lid seals properly, your salsa is safe.  HOWEVER, if you want to put them in a hot water bath or pressure cooker, you certainly can.

This is just what I’ve been looking for! I have only canned salsa once before, and I was disappointed that the final product turned out so thin. I have pinned this so I’ll know where to find it when tomato season rolls around.

After you’ve eaten your salsa, the jars and bands can be reused in future canning projects. However, you should never reuse lids – always purchase new lids (they are inexpensive) to ensure a proper seal.

If I had any complaints about this salsa recipe (which I don’t), it would be how long it takes to make a batch. There’s about 1.5 hours of prep time, plus around 2 hours of cooking time from start to finish. Because of this, I strongly encourage you to double or triple the recipe and just make a day out of it.

Remove the jars carefully from the water or steam bath and let cool to room temperature. Check to make sure the jars have sealed correctly (lightly press the top of the lid; it should be firm – if the center bubbles up and down when you press on it, it hasn’t easy refrigerator salsa recipe correctly and will need to be refrigerated or re-processed).

This quick-and-easy salsa tastes great as an accompaniment to meat dishes as well as with chips. I teach kindergarten and my husband is a county Extension agent. We’ve lived down here in the Imperial Valley for 30 years. I say “down here” because Holtville is 15 feet below sea level!

Made this last night and doubled the recipe. It only made 9 pints instead of 12. That’s not my concern though, it was the strong vinegar flavor. Does this dissipate after canning/setting for a period of time? Should I have added more sugar to modify prior to canning? I just didn’t want to have a sweet salsa either.

Every year I plant way more tomato seeds than any one family should, in hopes that a few plants will survive and thrive. I am not known for being the best gardener, yet I do get lucky every now and again.

I make a very similar recipe. Ours has a little less lime juice, and add some ACV. Also, e use canned diced tomatoes, but I think crushed might be even better. I can’t wait to try it! BTW, when do you add your cilantro? I couldn’t find that step in the recipe.

Copyright Note: While the copyright at the bottom of the page covers everything on An Oregon Cottage, permission is not required to use one image and no more than 2 lines of text IF you clearly provide a DIRECT LINK back to this source wherever the image appears. Please do not copy and publish full recipes. I appreciate all honest shares and features!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *