“easy homemade restaurant salsa recipe homemade spicy mango salsa recipe”

This is a really delicious BASIC salsa recipe. I have no idea why anyone would say it tastes disgusting. You have to make sure you have fresh ingredients though, particularly, fresh, and tasty, tomatoes. You can’t make tasty salsa without tasty ingredients! I use a jalepeno (and remove some of the seeds for my kids) and extra garlic every time. Salt plentifully. We serve it with everything Mexican – tonight chicken enchiladas, but also with carnitas tacos, chicken/steak fajitas. Love it!

But instead of plain ol’ Monterey Jack (whose beauty is not to be underestimated) or a cheddar/jack blend, I’m breaking out the good stuff. I found these at my precious little smalltown grocery store. First Parmigiano Regianno…and now this.

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It’s safe to make up your own recipes in some cases, too, but you have to be follow the rules. For instance, a mixed berry jam would be safe because berries generally have a low pH, and the sugar in jam ties up free water, which bacteria need to breed. Thick product and high pH product can easily get dangerous, especially in combination.

A food processor makes short work of herbs and garlic; you should toss these ingredients into the processor before you add the tomatoes. Use it to puree half or all of the tomatoes (you may prefer to keep some tomatoes chunky).

I don’t like runny salsa, either, so if I want thicker salsa when I’m using fresh tomatoes, after I cut up the tomatoes I put them in a colander to drain the excess fluid. I then use the fluid for soup stock, or just drink it. The salsa ends up good and thick!

Sadly, I just put up all my hot peppers yesterday so there won’t be any salsa for me. But I am printing and stashing this recipe for next fall when I’m up to my eye teeth in peppers and tomatoes again. Love the change to smoked paprika – it’s one of my favorite little game changers in chili and Mexican rice. Really beautiful photo (you know I watch those) and did I hear there’s a new bowl coming??

What advantage does simmering the Salsa make? Is this how it is done in most Mexican Restaurants? Believe me I am not criticizing I am just trying to learn. If this is a necessary step that I have been omitting and it will make my Salsa taste better I am all for it. I have just never heard of doing it before.

What better time of year to make some fresh salsa than right now?!  As I’ve mentioned before, my husband and I were lucky enough to live in the heart of Mexico for a few months as part of an internship program.  Mexican food has always been one of my favorites, and I absolutely loved getting to know “true” Mexican food while we lived there!

Just updating my own comment to say that the salsa turned out great! I left one jar unprocessed to eat right away and it’s delicious. I did add the optional sugar and the taste is an interesting combination of sweet and tart with a good kick from the jalapenos.

First let me say I normally don’t comment or rate recipes, as many times the raters did not even try the recipe and gives it 5 undeserved stars, “because the recipe sounds so good”, or “the pictures make me want to try it”. Or on the other hand they give a recipe only one or two stars after they completely change the recipe and then blame the author for a bad tasteless fare. Your recipe here as written needs to be changed completely (the name that is) you should call this “The Best Damned Freaking Chunky Salsa Sauce in the Universe !!” This stuff is good, and being a self professed Salsa connoisseur I am qualified to make that judgment! I did not add the cilantro as I don’t like the taste of it, and because I refrigerated it I did not add as much lime or vinegar as one would have to do for canning. The family loved it and also proclaimed this as some of the best Salsa they ever had. Have this recipe bookmarked and will definitely make again. Thanks for some good stuff! Oh by the way you look exactly like my brother Larry!

Hi Laurie, I am going to give your salsa a try – never canned it before. Quick question, have you canned kimchi before? I made it last summer but had to keep in refrigerator because of fermentation. Haven’t been able to find a safe recipe for canning. Thank you!

I’ve been wanting to try canning, and this seems like a good way to try it. I love salsa and could put it on almost anything. In fact, one of my favorite busy night recipes is to put two chicken breasts and 16 ounces of salsa (usually one whole jar) in a baking dish and bake at 350 for 30 minutes. So easy and delicious. Thanks for sharing.

Now to the topic at hand – I’ve had the same concerns as you, especially since my dear husband is Mexican! We loved the canned salsa I made for the first week or two, then it was too vinegary, so now I use it for stuff like zucchini squash to use it up. Haven’t tried it again because, well we don’t have enough tomatoes yet and am leery about the vinegar and how to make it spicy enough. I never thought to skimp on the onions to compensate!!!

“Salsas are usually mixtures of acid and low-acid ingredients; they are an example of an acidified food. The specific recipe, and sometimes preparation method, will determine if a salsa can be processed in a boiling water canner or a pressure canner. A process must be scientifically determined for each recipe. ”

Hi! Thanks for posting this great salsa recipe! I have made over 40 pints this year. I have made another kind for over 20 years and wanted a change. I found where you got this recipe. It is from the Ball Complete Book of Home Preserving, page 203. I like your version better! Thanks!

There is not a better time to make large quantities of tomato sauces or salsas. Canning is often the preferred method to store sauces for use later, but freezing is also an option which many prefer—especially those who have large freezer space. (Our directions below can be used for freezing or canning; see the note about canning at the end.)

I pride myself on being a professional snacker. How do you become one? By eating a lot, a lot of snacks. However since my love for snacking is so deep, I always try to make sure that I make the healthiest choices possible when picking what to munch on.

I didn’t take your comment as being mean in any way. You want people to be safe and so do I. If I felt this method was unsafe, I would not have shared it. I did add to my post and to the recipe that canning or a hot water bath can be used as well.

This is my favorite salsa recipe! Thank you for sharing it. I has to substitute half lemon half lime today. That should be ok, right? Also, I doubled the batch and got 13 1/2 pints. Last year I also https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCEBG6L4px6fNxT0gEi9kmhw extra than what the recipe called for. I weigh and measure everything precisely. I notice that after I strain the tomatoes and boil/simmer them that the consistency is still watery. Should I just squeeze the tomatoes after staining? This still should be ok to eat even though it made more?

For me and my home-grown peppers, Virginia, every year is different! Seasons where we have a lot of hot weather will make the peppers hotter and visa versa. But you can control the heat by adding less jalapenos – or leaving them out entirely and replacing them with sweet peppers.

I’ve read so many forums on this dang salsa recipe (it originated on the gardenweb forum) and to be honest, I’m not sure. There are a lot of people that say don’t deviate from the recipe for food safety and others say the tomato paste and tomato sauce can be optional because mostly you just want a mixture that sloshes around freely (if it’s too thick, apparently it can’t be heated through well enough to prevent bacteria from growing). My gut feeling says you are ok…but you’ll just want to use your best judgment.

[…] brimming with red balls of beautiful fruit. I’ve already preserved about fifteen jars of my Homemade Salsa and today I’ll be making batches of Tomato Sauce for this Winter. I love being able to pull […]

What a gorgeous post. Your salsa looks delicious and has the added virtue of being easy to do. I am new here but will be back. I really like the food and recipes you feature. I hope you have a great day. Blessings…Mary

I made a double batch last night and my husband can’t get over how delicious this recipe is! It truly IS thick!! I am in the middle of another batch only this time I tripled it. That way I should be done for a year. Thank you SO much for sharing this recipe and taking the time to experiment to find that “just right” recipe! I really appreciate it!

Hi Claudia, yes, that is possible. It’s not supposed to be super thick. However, tomatoes thicken up a ton in the fridge as they chill. So place the salsa in your fridge and check it tomorrow or several hours later today and it should have thickened up much better.

I just made this using jalapeños instead of serrano. I used a larger onion and one more tomato. Now I boiled then simmered but it didn’t get as red as the photo above. Is this normal or did I do something wrong? How do I get that deep red tone?

My friend Molly makes a killer salsa and after having hers a couple of times, I decided to make something similar. I started with a can of fire roasted tomatoes that I was staring at one day in my supermarket and took it from there.

Wash, peel, seed, and chop your ingredients first, then measure or weigh them. A kitchen scale comes in very handy when preserving the harvest. I have included both weight and cup measurements in the recipe below. Select one method of measuring and stick with it throughout the recipe so the ratio of ingredients remains the same.

Looks delicious! I think you are putting them in half-pint jars here, though? But maybe your pint jars just look skinny on the computer screen 😀 if so, disregard. I’m going to add this to my list of things I want to can!

These tortilla chips are USDA organic certified, non-GMO project verified, and they come in a variety of flavors. I picked up our personal favorites: the new Yellow Corn tortilla chips and the Blue Corn tortilla chips. You can also find new Multigrain tortilla chips at your local stores!

Add just 1/4 cup chopped onion to the bowl. This doesn’t seem like a lot, considering that in my Pico de Gallo recipe, I preach and preach about how important it is for the onion to receive equal billing with the tomatoes. But for this salsa, it’s best to go subtle with the onions.

I’m really looking forward to trying your salsa recipe, this year is the first year I’ll be canning and there are now 2 of your recipes I’d like to try. Is it possible to replace citric acid for the vinegar in this recipes? I already plan on using the citric acid for your canned roasted tomato sauce. Thanks!

Water bath canning involves submerging the jars in boiling water for a set period of processing time. It is suitable for high acid foods. Pressure canning (not pressure cooking) involves processing the jars in a sealed pressure canner at elevated temperature and pressure. You must can all low acid foods. You can can high acid foods, but most people just water bath can them. Some folks prefer dealing with the steam over dealing with a big pot of boiling water, which is why I give both options for this recipe. It is heavy on tomatoes and also has added vinegar, which should keep the pH below 4.6.

Just made this salsa!! Roasted a can of whole tomatoes, the onions, jalepeno pepper and garlic first. I will never buy store salsa again. Just think of how good it will be when tomatoes are in season!!

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