“easy homemade garden salsa recipe homemade salsa recipe with fresh tomatoes food processor”

I’ve made salsa very similar to your recipe for years. People never believe me when I tell them it is mostly from canned tomatoes and takes only 5 minutes. I also like to use the fire-roasted tomatoes with garlic, too. Adds another layer of smokey flavor!

Filed Under: Appetizers, Snacks and Sides, Video Recipes Tagged With: fresh salsa recipes, gluten free, homemade salsa recipes, how to make salsa, making salsa at home, pico de gallo, salsa fresca, salsa recipe, vegan, vegetarian, video recipe

9. You don’t need to pressure cook or hot bath because the hot salsa seals the jars on their own. The vinegar in the recipe along with the acid of the tomatoes kills the bacteria while cooking. However, if you feel you would like to pressure cook or use a hot bath for your jars, you can and it will not affect the salsa.

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Remove the jars from the stockpot and place onto a cloth-covered or wood surface, several inches apart, until cool. Once cool, press the top of each lid with a finger, ensuring that the seal is tight (lid does not move up or down at all). Refrigerate after opening.

Used your recipe – produced 5 pints of thick and chunky salsa for canning last night. Had a tiny bit leftover that I just tasted – YUM! My changes – Didn’t have Anaheim peppers – so used “banana” type peppers (it’s what I had on hand!) and I only used 2 jalapenos, one seeded, the other everything. I had help with all the chopping, etc., so it was not as time-consuming as I expected. Thanks!!

Combine red onion, white onion, yellow onion, tomatoes, banana peppers, green peppers, tomato paste, white vinegar, garlic powder, salt, cayenne pepper, cumin, brown sugar, and white sugar in a large pot. Simmer until thick, about 3 hours.

P.S. somehow I just discovered your blog and my kids actually ate the two skillet recipes I made! We’re putting them on our rotation along with the broiled fish tacos. They didn’t like those, but my husband raved about them so the kids are out of luck. 🙂

Thank you, Jami! That explanation makes perfect sense. I’ve been researching canning a ton and the different acid types for different foods was the only thing that still had me stumped. Friends and family tease me about stressing out over botulism, but that is NOT a risk I am willing to take despite them telling me to “do it just like your grandma did, we loved her stuff” so I was very happy to come across your blog (way too many sites with recipes that are not approved). I had a huge crop of San Marzano tomatoes this year so I can’t wait to make your sauce and salsa (and my tried and true salsa for the fridge – but not to can ;).

Best home canned salsa I have ever had!! My garden tomatoes have been put to good use. Thank you so much for seeking out the recipe and tweaking it for the rest of us. I will now have to look and see what else you have tucked into your pages! I love to cook and try new recipes, so looks like a good site for me!

Good morning Cheryl. If you’re looking for thick salsa, you’ve come to the right place! Our salsa is thick and tasty! The extra effort is well worth the results. There isn’t any reason you couldn’t use a pressure canner with this recipe. Let us know how it turns out.

Also, for those who are too lazy to put on gloves to cut chile peppers, you can always use a fork and knife, as if you were cutting them to eat them. That’s how they do it in Mexico. Just a note: they don’t even cut them with their bare hands down there, so don’t try it at home!

Fresh cilantro would decrease the acidity, Rose, so I’d be careful – maybe 1/4 c. but then decrease the onions or peppers by a couple tablespoons or increase the vinegar by a tablespoon? I like to play it safe – I know many people can salsa that’s full of fresh ingredients, but food is just not worth playing with for me, so I try to go by the book. Personally, if we want cilantro, we add it when we use it – it tastes fresher then, too. 🙂

I think so, but maybe see if the Ball Blue Book or another official canning resource has a recipe using lemon/lime juice as the acid is critical for safe canning! I do know that you should use bottled juice and not fresh, as the acid is a known quantity.

It’s safe to make up your own recipes in some cases, too, but you have to be follow the rules. For instance, a mixed berry jam would be safe because berries generally have a low pH, and the sugar in jam ties up free water, which bacteria need to breed. Thick product and high pH product can easily get dangerous, especially in combination.

I need to start making my own salsa because we buy the jarred stuff use it for our meal and by the time we use it again it’s no longer good. At least when I make it I can control the quantity and fresh always trumps jarred. Love the brightness!

I have canned a lot of salsa throughout the years with great success. This year I was looking for a recipe that was thick and a little crunchy and fresh tasting. The recipe is excellent and there’s no need to change a thing unless you want a hotter salsa. I can’t recommend the recipe enough!!! Thank you!!!

Today we finally had enough good tomatoes to make one batch of salsa. (My tomatoes and a few peppers got hit by End Bottom Rot and I easy refrigerator salsa recipe I have it under control now.)  I will say this – if you want to make salsa – have enough ingredients and pans to make up 2 – 4 batches or more to cut down on your time in the kitchen.  By the end of next week we should have enough tomatoes to make the 2 – 4 batches at once but we were anxious to make our first batch today and patience is not our middle name.

This recipe is very tasty, but we followed it exactly and it was way too watery. Had to drain a ton of liquid off. After draining the liquid we only got 8 pints. Next time I think I would hand chop the tomatoes instead of using the food processor.

I like your method for skinning the tomatoes, I just do not know if it will work for pressure canning salsa ? Cooling them quick keeps them from cooking any further after blanching . Also if pressure canning you can add more cilantro and chilies ( chipotles in adobo ) are a excellent addition . Cheers !

Hi Sherell 🙂 I’m glad you like the flavor! I always make it as written, so I can’t say for sure, but you could always place a mesh sieve over a bowl and pour the salsa through the sieve. Then you can add some of the liquid until you get to the consistency you prefer 🙂

This is a really delicious BASIC salsa recipe. I have no idea why anyone would say it tastes disgusting. You have to make sure you have fresh ingredients though, particularly, fresh, and tasty, tomatoes. You can’t make tasty salsa without tasty ingredients! I use a jalepeno (and remove some of the seeds for my kids) and extra garlic every time. Salt plentifully. We serve it with everything Mexican – tonight chicken enchiladas, but also with carnitas tacos, chicken/steak fajitas. Love it!

This healthy take on the traditional chips-and-salsa combo is nearly fat-free and super-refreshing. The antioxidant-rich salsa is delicious served right after it’s made, but the flavors meld nicely after a day or two in the refrigerator.

I have never bough store salsa, my mom and I have always made lots of salsa every fall with our produce from our garden! I’m willing to give a few toes to bet it’s the best. salsa. ever. EVER! 🙂 However, it requires a lot more time and more romas than your recipe, so I stayed up last night after putting the kids to bed and made yours. I loved your trick of putting the romas in the oven – life changing! The salsa is delicious, thank you! I will definitely continue to make my mom’s recipe, but this recipe comes close and will stay in my recipe binder. 🙂 Thanks!

You can’t really appreciate this salsa until about a month after canning. I’ve tasted many versions of homemade canned salsa and this is the best! Has a very nice consistency. Here’s what I found: I tasted it during the canning process and was somewhat disappointed at the vinegar taste but that pretty much disappeared after it cured for a month. I had added almost all of the sugar to counter the vinegar flavor and was sorry I did because it was a little sweet after curing. (I used Big Boy and Early Girl tomatoes.) The ground pepper was also very strong during the canning process but mellowed after a month. I like a medium hot salsa and was a little shy on the jalapenos…used only 3. I would definitely increase that to 5 or 6. In the meantime, I’m stirring some red pepper flakes into each jar as I open them. I also couldn’t taste the cilantro after curing so I would increase that as well. Thanks for sharing this recipe!

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