“easy good homemade salsa recipe homemade chip salsa recipe”

Once you have the tomatoes skinned you have 2 options.  If you have a food processor – cut them into quarters and finely chop them in the food processor.  If you don’t have one, cut them into little pieces yourself.  Last year I didn’t have a food process to use and it took us much longer to complete the prep process.  This year I have my mom’s old one and it saved us at least 10 minutes of cutting time.

Carl, thanks for the comments. Glad you like the salsa! As for coring, I usually just cut out the top stem/core, running my knife into the top of the tomato at an angle, essentially cutting a diamond shape out of the tomato, which includes most of the core. I do the same thing for any small tomatoes in the batch. But if yours are too small, just do the best you can. Small plum tomatoes often don’t have much of a hard stem/vine core anyway, so you may just be able to skip this step.

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LOVE this! We make it all the time. Be careful, it’s very addicting. We don’t put honey in it though, I’ll have to try that. We also make a big batch, so we use 4 cans of Rotel, 2 original and 2 mild. It’s gives it a lot of heat without having to use many jalapenos. My husband usually puts a little olive oil in his too. Lots and lots of cilantro makes this fantastic though! 🙂

Rachael, did you still put the full amount of cider vinegar into the batch of salsa and when putting into jars, individually add the lemon juice to each jar…if so, were they pint and how did this batch turn out? Thanks, Nancy

2 Roast chile peppers: Roast the Anaheim green chile peppers until blackened all over. The best way to do this is directly over a gas flame on the stovetop (see how to roast chiles over a gas flame.) If you don’t have a gas cooktop you can broil the chiles, or blister them on a grill.

We are excited to welcome you to Pocket Change Gourmet, a collaborative effort aimed at helping families rediscover the joy of cooking a delicious frugal meal together. We look forward to sharing our ideas and experiences as we grow.

Hi Caitlin – I’m not sure – the method is entirely different with an InstantPot (it uses high pressure to can). I’ve read that the pressure doesn’t get high enough in an InstantPot to safely can foods so you might want to check into that before trying.

Mexican food is my favorite, so I make it alllll the time. Most of the time, whatever I’ve made, I feel like it just HAS to be topped with my beloved sour cream (pretty sure that’s not authentic, buuuuut I love it) and of course, some sort of salsa or pico de gallo.

I’ve never seen a salsa recipe like that – and it’s a good thing! I love the creativity of this recipe, and I think my favorite part is the charring of the vegetables. I bet that really amps up the flavor! Great recipe, Amy!

Q. My question is about salsa. I was going to borrow a pressure cooker to make salsa this year (for the first time). My grandma told me that I didn’t need the pressure cooker, I could just make salsa using the “inversion” method like I did the blueberry jam. Can I do this?

My husband’s favorite restaurant, naturally, is a local Mexican bar: “…famous Mexican cafe. It’s the great taste of Mexico right in your neighborhood.” (Can you just hear the corny commercial jingle?) It’s not exactly in our neighborhood, but it’s worth the 20-minute drive. They have a wet burrito that enables you to skip looking at the menu altogether.

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