“canning fresh homemade salsa recipe +homemade salsa recipe from fresh tomatoes”

That said, I’ll be canning salsa again this weekend and intend to fully enjoy the finished product! Try making your own sourdough tortilla chips via the instructions at the GNOWFGLINS eCourse on sourdough (yum!).

There is nothing better than the flavor of homemade salsa in the middle of winter to bring back memories of summer. This highly rated recipe “Diner’s Freezer Salsa” by Diann Godbey from http://www.food.com/recipe/diners-freezer-salsa-12275 is a real winner for its ease and flavorful result.

How long do you find this will last in the fridge? I’m doing a Fix 21 program and would like to make a batch to add to my meals when I need some variety aside from broccoli (which I do enjoy, just not every night :))

Super Fast Blender Salsa: Buy up cases of tomatoes when they go on sale. If you can’t find cheap tomatoes with jalapenos, buy a jalapeno separately and use plain diced tomatoes. A lemon can swap in for the lime also. Use up some of the tender cilantro stems to save extra money here. Recipe found at Prudence Pennywise.

This looks fantastic. I will definitely try the blender method to save preparation time. However, I would recommend using fresh ingredients rather than canned for a healthier and fresher flavor…always!

oh girl…you are giving me salsa cravings! I always thought I was a chunky pico de gallo salsa type girl, until I started making it like this. I’ve never added rotel to mine, and honey either! changing it up next time! I love seeing those specks of heavenly cilantro!

Thank you, Jami! That explanation makes perfect sense. I’ve been researching canning a ton and the different acid types for different foods was the only thing that still had me stumped. Friends and family tease me about stressing out over botulism, but that is NOT a risk I am willing to take despite them telling me to “do it just like your grandma did, we loved her stuff” so I was very happy to come across your blog (way too many sites with recipes that are not approved). I had a huge crop beer salsa recipe San Marzano tomatoes this year so I can’t wait to make your sauce and salsa (and my tried and true salsa for the fridge – but not to can ;).

The only sad thing about tomatoes is that they don’t last. A beautiful, ripe tomato will keep for a week at most before it goes bad. So when the frost comes and kills the plants, that’s the end of garden-fresh tomatoes until next year.

Hi Lauren. Your “small air bubble” batch of salsa should be fine. Eat and enjoy! As for storage time, most canning books tell you to store in a dark cool place for up to a year. That’s sound advice, as canned food starts to loose its nutritional value after that. However, I’ve eaten a few jars of this salsa that were 2 and 3 years old, and they still tasted great and had a good texture. They maybe just weren’t as “fresh” feeling. That all being said, if your gift recipients like salsa, it probably won’t last more than a week or two!

Now to the topic at hand – I’ve had the same concerns as you, especially since my dear husband is Mexican! We loved the canned salsa I made for the first week or two, then it was too vinegary, so now I use it for stuff like zucchini squash to use it up. Haven’t tried it again because, well we don’t have enough tomatoes yet and am leery about the vinegar and how to make it spicy enough. I never thought to skimp on the onions to compensate!!!

I’ve made salsa very similar to your recipe for years. People never believe me when I tell them it is mostly from canned tomatoes and takes only 5 minutes. I also like to use the fire-roasted tomatoes with garlic, too. Adds another layer of smokey flavor!

Are you sitting down?…. because I’m sharing the best damn salsa ever, with you today! If you’re a salsa person and I know you are, you have got to give this delicious homemade salsa a try. The bright, fresh dip is absolutely irresistible- loaded with delicious, vibrant flavor and it comes together in less than 5 minutes.

Tomatoes are a borderline acid / low acid fruit (see this page about tomato acidity for more information) – adding lemon juice helps, processing according to the specified times (determined by the USDA) in the water bath canner almost eliminates spoilage.  You should boost the acid level of the sauce, by adding 2 tablespoons of lemon juice or 1/2 teaspoon of citric acid per quart of sauce. (or half that, for pint jars)

Chop the jalapeno peppers.  If you like your salsa hot, leave the white pith/membranes.  Contrary to popular belief, it’s not the seeds that are hot, it’s the white pith that surrounds them.  It’s always recommended that you use gloves while handling chili peppers.

Wife, mom, business owner, volunteer, lover of chocolate, procrastinator of cleaning, experiencing life in my 40’s and not putting off to tomorrow what I’ve wanted to do for a long time. I stop lookin’ and get cookin’ in all areas of life.

This ones a keeper! Just started a garden this year and I didn’t know what to do with all the tomatoes and peppers I got out of it. I don’t cook often, didn’t know anything about making salsa or canning, but this recipe is easy to follow and if I can do it, anyone can. Expect a lot of complements on it when you share it! I will definitely make a bigger batch next go around. Thank you for sharing your recipe!

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