“best homemade salsa recipe a spicy perspective +fresh homemade salsa recipe”

Besides being delicious, “The BEST Salsa Recipe” is so, so easy to make, literally throw everything in your blender, Vitamix, Ninja or food processor and tah-dah! All you need to do after that is taste and adjust the flavors to your preference for sweetness and/or heat and grab a straw…err I mean chip! It also makes a great food or hostess gift! 

Brighten up your favorite main dishes by adding fresh Serrano-Cilantro Salsa. We love serving this as a topping on our savory flank steak Suadero Tacos. Cooking the serrano peppers along with diced onion and garlic brings out a smoky flavor. Be sure to process the pepper mixture and the rest of the ingredients in order to make sure this salsa is totally dippable.

“Albeit using canned tomatoes really makes this speedy, using fresh tomatoes very special. And it really doesn’t take that much longer. Other than that, I followed the recipe; don’t be tempted to use dried oregano — it doesn’t work.”

I made this and it’s amazing! I left Texas about a year ago and have been missing authentic Tex-Mex salsa so much… until I found this recipe! I use 4 jalapenos, and leave some seeds in, to make it a little spicier 🙂

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Woo Hoo!! I’m a definite pushover for kitchen tools. I don’t actually have this one. Shocking, I know. I love the size that it makes the pieces of tomato and onion. So uniform. 🙂 You can’t go wrong with fresh salsa.

Add just 1/4 cup chopped onion to the bowl. This doesn’t seem like a lot, considering that in my Pico de Gallo recipe, I preach and preach about how important it is for the onion to receive equal billing with the tomatoes. But for this salsa, it’s best to go subtle with the onions.

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Your no till gardening, tho I think we’ll have to till once to make the garden bed!! If we are diligent to do it now we can plastic cover it over-winter. So, I’ve decided not to buy a tiller, just rent it – thanks to your post I came across today!! 🙂

It doesn’t take much effort to whip up delicious bites that leave an impression. I really think anyone can cook, if they want to. I hope you find a few favorites here that you want to make again and again! Cheers!! – Colleen

Combine the diced tomatoes, whole tomatoes, cilantro, onions, garlic, jalapeno, cumin, salt, sugar and lime juice in a blender or food processor. (This is a very large batch. I recommend using a 12-cup food processor, or you can process the ingredients in batches and then mix everything together in a large mixing bowl.) 


A few questions. You mention coring. The Plum tomatoes I used were a bit big. Maybe 3 1/2″. After skinning, I cut them lengthwise into 4 quarters. And had to core each quarter. There was a lot of core on each one. Took a while to finish. Is that normal for smaller tomatoes? Any easier way?

I’m really looking forward to trying your salsa recipe, this year is the first year I’ll be canning and there are now 2 of your recipes I’d like to try. Is it possible to replace citric acid for the vinegar in this recipes? I already plan on using the citric acid for your canned roasted tomato sauce. Thanks!

Toss the squeezed (Squozen? 🙂 tomatoes into a colander or drainer, while you work on others. This helps more of the water to drain off.  You may want to save the liquid: if you then pass it through a sieve, screen or cheesecloth, you have fresh tomato juice; great to drink cold or use in cooking!

This was so good and so fast!! I didn’t have rotel on hand so I took another posters advice and used two cans of diced tomatoes and doubled the salt and jalapeno. I WILL be making this exactly as the recipe states because I’m sure it’s delicious as is. I am no longer hungry for the taco’s I was gong to make because of this addicting salsa!

Hey thanks Brian! We love hearing from satisfied readers. Glad you like the salsa! I hope you try some other Bald recipes too. They’re all delicious. We have some great outdoor recipes under our camping section, and loads of other tasty treats throughout the site. Enjoy!

I’m Mel, lover of great food, easy recipes and dark chocolate. I’m also a busy mom to 5 kids (+ 16 chickens, 4 cows, 1 dog, 1 cat, 1 beardie, and about 10,423 honey bees)! It’s a bit crazy, a lot yummy, and very real around here.

I am a home cook, recipe developer, coffee drinker, wife and mom of two. My recipes are simple and tasty. I enjoy lots of fresh, healthy food, plus full treats without guilt. Thanks so much for stopping by! Want to know more?

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Sounds fabulous Lea Ann. I love smoked paprika and I’m sure it made a great addition. As I read this I thought of Larry and his homemade tomato juice. What do you bet he’ll be making your salsa next year with his bounty of tomatoes.

This semi-homemade salsa comes together in a flash. All you need to do is give corn kernals a good char in a skillet for about 2 minutes. Stir the corn into store-bought salsa, add a hearty dose of cilantro, and this so-simple salsa is ready for noshing. We like serving it with our Pork Tenderloin Wraps, but we don’t think you’ll have any problem finding even more unique and interesting ways to serve it up to friends and family. 

You can make this salsa as fiery as you like by adding more or less peppers. But whatever you do, don’t leave them out. And because everything goes into the food processor, you can make the salsa chunky or smooth with just a flick of the switch.

My husband makes a fabulous salsa with fresh tomatoes and other fresh peppers andetc. but also adds a can of canned tomatos. Is it okay to follow the canning process and also add the canned tomatoes making it safe to eat???

Amazing. I had about half amount of prepared tomatoes so I divided the other ingredients in half pretty much. I only put 1/4 cup apple vinegar in.  I’m so proud of myself!  Tomorrow I will can the mixture in a hot water bath. No time today. 

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4. Bake cake 60 minutes or until center is 205 degrees, measured with https://great-salsa.com/category/canning/ meat thermometer. The cake will be golden brown and firm to the touch. Let cool in pie plate on a wire rack. Cut into wedges and serve with whipped cream. Cake can be stored at room temperature, loosely covered, up to 2 days.

It’s the quickest salsa recipe ever, it takes just 5 minutes to whip up and it’s so delicious, fresh and bursting with flavors. You just throw everything in the food processor, give a few pulses, and it’s done. Perfect salsa!

This is very similar to the salsa I make. I use a combo of Anaheim and jalapenos, which I char on the stove or the grill. I also add a few splashes (I don’t measure either) of red wine vinegar, a splash of olive oil, and half a splash of liquid smoke. Almost like Chevy’s salsa.

Lemon is more acidic than vinegar. If you replace the vinegar with lemon, it should be fine. If the pH is too high and you’re breeding botulism spores, there would be no obvious signs of the problem. If the pH is low enough to prevent botulism (4.6 or lower), spoilage would be likely be indicated by mold growth, bulging lids or other obvious signs of spoilage. If reprocessing is needed, it should be done within 24 hours.

I have a beloved salsa recipe I have used for years. I canned a ton of it last year and thought I would try your recipe for some this year. I have a daughter who does not love cumin. Is the cumin flavor really strong in this salsa? I think the rest of my family would love it! Also do you have a good spaghetti sauce recipe for canning? Thanks for all you do! I have followed your blog almost from the beginning, my family always jokes when I give them a new recipe to try and say “is it from Mels?”

Just made this for our Cinco de Mayo dinner for tonight. It was pretty good! I did have to change a few things. First, I think the store forgot to bag our onion, so I just put in some onion powder. Secondly, my husband picked up the Mexican Ro-tel, which has cilantro and lime juice already in it. I still added more cilantro, as I believe fresh cilantro tastes waaaay better than anything else, but I forgot to add the lime juice. I also only added a 1/4 of a seeded jalapeño.

This recipe is FANTASTIC!!! I have tried others and have not been satisfied with the consistency. This recipe really does end up thick and chunky and delicious. I added some mini-bell peppers (red, yellow, and orange) and only used half the cilantro, (I made a double batch). Almost everything else I left the same and the consistency, flavor and spice was fantastic. I will use this recipe again and again. Thank you so much for posting!

Some roasted tomatillo salsas I’ve tried taste too roasted/smoky, but not this one. You can also control just how roasted those tomatillos get when you roast them yourself. I think it turned out just right with the times specified in the recipe below.

Some say that jalapenos with a pointier end will have more heat.  Others suggest peppers that look like they have been under duress (ones with scars or lines that run down the pepper) will be hotter.  The membranes of jalapenos contain the most concentrated amounts of capsaicin, which adds the most heat.  If you are wanting a mild salsa, remove the membranes and seeds before adding the jalapenos.  If you want a spicier salsa, leave them in. Whenever handling raw jalapenos, it is a good idea to wear gloves and avoid touching your eyes.

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