“best homemade chunky salsa recipe |best homemade fresh tomato salsa recipe”

Sterilize the jars and lids in boiling water for at least 5 minutes. Pack the salsa into the hot, sterilized jars, filling the jars to within 1/4 inch of the top. Run a knife or a thin spatula around the insides of the jars after they have been filled to remove any air bubbles. Wipe the rims of the jars with a moist paper towel to remove any food residue. Top with lids, and screw on rings.

Put all of this into a stock pot.  I used a dutch oven for this batch and it was just the right size.  Next you need to add your minced garlic, vinegar, salt and cilantro.  Stir it up well and place on the stovetop on high until it starts to boil.

I just came in from picking an overwhelming amount of cherry tomatoes and jalapenos and wanted to whip up some fresh salsa. I did a quick search and came to your recipe. Wow! Perfect! Can’t wait till my hubby tries it. And I think this would freeze well. I would put in quart size zipper bags in the desired amount. It may be a little thinner at thaw time, but you could add a little guacamole or avocado to thicken it up at the point of use.

To finish the tomato prep, dice the tomatoes into small chunks and place in colander to drain off excess juice. We prefer to scrape out most of the seeds and squeeze out excess juice for a thicker salsa. If desired, juice can be strained and drunk, or canned separately for later use.

Where have you been all my life. I love the fresh salsa that Bev makes but just care for the cooked stuff – Pace or otherwise. It looks like the quick processing keeps this more toward the fresh end – and the recipe sounds good as well.

Yum. Simple, straight forward. This tastes like what I grew up with in Texas. It is exceptional with garden-fresh tomatoes. But sadly, the flavors wane substantially after just 1 day – make enough for now, but don’t bother saving the leftovers – they will be mediocre tomorrow.

I have got to try this recipe next year. We didn’t have a garden this year, but next year I WILL have a garden, even if it’s in containers. I love home canned everything. No preservatives and I know what is in there.

Although, my hubby doesn’t measure when he makes food. So, I had to stand right there with him this time, so I could measure everything he put in.  He said I was cramping his mojo, but I couldn’t share a recipe that said a pinch of this and a pinch of that.  Ya know?

Next add one large can of whole peeled tomatoes, starting with the juice and then with the tomatoes. I found that this method helped me from ending up with tomato juice speckled clothes which then saved me all from having to pre-treat the white shirt I wore while making salsa.

I am going to try this recipe today using roma tomatoes. I just wanted to add, most recipes call for de-seeding and squeezing out all tomato juice from the tomatoes. I have learned that you can cook down the juice and seeds, ( one year I had 2 quarts of tomato liquid …slowly cooked down to 1 half pint ) this way all my ingredients were fresh garden and not canned. The thickened tomato seed juice was so close to paste that it thickened the salsa I made. I just incorporated it into my tomatoes measurements. Trying that with your recipe. Ty


Fill inexpensive, reusable glass jars with Spring Salsa and chips for easy carrying. This colorful salsa of corn, tomatoes, and cilantro would be equally delicious served over salad greens or in warm tortillas with grilled chicken.

Authentic Pico de Gallo Recipe – By far the best pico de gallo recipe we’ve made. A fresh Salsa Fresca recipe for tacos, fajitas, and even with chips with fresh pico. (aka salsa with fresh tomatoes) (Authentic Vegan Tacos)

There always a debate as to which kinds of tomatoes are the best for making salsa.  The answer is simply this:  The best tomatoes are ripe tomatoes.  Whichever ones you can find that have the most flavor.  If they happen to have a higher water content, that’s fine.  We’ll drain them.

Just finished making the salsa with the lemon juice and it’s wonderful! Not vinegary tasting. I only planted sweet peppers this year so this is strictly a sweet salsa. Next year I’ll be adding hot peppers to the garden just for this recipe

Just made salsa the aroma of salsa is the bomb! Followed recipe exactly and I taste tested before canning this is the best salsa recipe I have ever made! Thank you for publishing this wonderful recipe!

In the photos it looks like you used red onion. Is that your recommendation? And is that green pepper I see? Also, how fine do you cut the spicy peppers? I don’t want someone to get a big spicy mouthful!

@Carl. My wife is Mexican and I’ve traveled there many times; particularly the state of Michoacán where she’s from. In Mexico, the sauce that you make is called a “Salsa Cruda” (Raw Sauce). It is perfectly fine to make it without frying/simmering since it’s just one of the MANY ways to make a sauce in the Mexican kitchen. I must say that adding cumin to a sauce is more typical of Tex Mex than the authentic Mexican style sauce. Also, lime is only added to something such as pico de gallo. Salsa verde is another sauce that made by cooking tomatillos, jalapeños and a couple garlic cloves in slightly boiling water for about 10 min. Once the tomatillos are cooked, you add them with a little bit of the cooking water, the chilies, garlic, a piece of white onion, cilantro and salt to a food processor. This is carefully processed due to the hot liquid. Tomatillos can be pretty acidic so a pinch of sugar can be added to counter that. I’ve been in a ranch in Michoacán where they cooked a tomato pepper salsa recipe over a wood fire. I saw them make the “birria” (typical Mexican sauce for roasted meats) over the same wood fire. It picked up the smoke taste and I’ll tell you, it was the best BBQ goat that I EVER had!

Once the salsa is blended, you are going to fry it in 2 tablespoons of hot cooking oil. To fry it you just pour it into the hot oil. This step is important to develop the flavor of the salsa and helps bind it. Don’t skip it.

When using fresh chile peppers always taste first before adding! Some peppers are hotter than others and you really can’t tell unless you taste them. Just take a very small taste. You’ll be able to gauge the heat of the pepper and will be better able to judge how much you need.

This ones a keeper! Just started a garden this year and I didn’t know what to do with all the tomatoes and peppers I got out of it. I don’t cook often, didn’t know anything about making salsa or canning, but this recipe is easy to follow and if I can do it, anyone can. Expect a lot of complements on it when you share it! I will definitely make a bigger batch next go around. Thank you for sharing your recipe!

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